Continuing our dialogue ....

Anne Dalke's picture
What a great start we had, last week, to our "dia/blog" among Parkway West High School and Bryn Mawr College students. Thanks to all who came, listened, and spoke!

So: let's keep @ it. Feel free to continue sharing any education-related thoughts and questions here.
 
And/or respond to (and push back on?) this posting from last week, by "Marvin Gaye":

To be able to have some type of success in life you must be certified….
Why must you pay to get a role in Society?


Comments

Ralph Abernathy's picture

People contradict their selfs a lot

When brynmawr student said some good things when they came to our class. But one thing that got me was that when a teacher ask do you think you have to go to college to to good in life. The reson it got me was because they people that said that you don't,way are they in college. If you don't have to go to college way did you go. Also yall are all freshmans so you can drop ouit if you feel tht way. Not saying you should. Everyone has there reasons.

Rae Hamilton's picture

Now that I am in college

Now that I am in college, I feel  I am able to see that it is not for everyone. When your high school youre are told that you must go to college in order to be successful. When you are in college, no is telling you to stay and no one is telling yhou that you will leave successful. I feel that for the most part you will become successful if you got college, yet it is not hundred percent necessary. Nor do I feel like its a contradiction, no one said that college was bad, its just that its not a fool-proof solution. 

MVW1993's picture

I think you bring up a really

I think you bring up a really good point here – it is very contradictory for all of us to say that people don’t have to go to college to be successful. But I think that when the majority of us responded to this question, we weren’t really thinking about ourselves but about everyone else. For example, when I heard the question I thought about my Dad and how, even though he did go to college, what he did to make himself successful had nothing to do with what he went to college for or even the fact that he did go to college. The experiences he considers successful in his life are things such as biking across the country, working at a ski resort during the day so that he could go skiing for free at night, and opening up his own bike and ski shop. These were things that he felt very passionately about and things that made him happy. Personally, I think that is the true definition of success: doing what makes you passionate and happy. For me, this means going to college, which is why I am at Bryn Mawr and why I don’t intend to drop out. But for others, this may mean something entirely different, like my high school friend who is taking a year to volunteer in Ecuador - something that she feels truly passionate about. Through my own experience and the experiences of others, I still hold my opinion that college does not necessarily make a person successful. The only thing that will really make a person successful is pursuing what makes them happy and passionate. 

alesnick's picture

Defining "Certify"

  1. Attest or confirm in a formal statement.
  2. Officially recognize (someone or something) as possessing certain qualifications or meeting certain standards.

This comes from Google's definition, and I am wondering how it applies to this discussion.  When must a person be labeled as having met external, communal standards of some kind?  Can certification ever be informal?  

nbnguyen's picture

Certification is an unfair tool for success

I am very interested in your discussion about the role of certification in personal success. Certification may be regarded as an award or an incentive for people to give the best effort. If you want to be certified as a college student, it is obvious that you will work much harder than someone who does not have a goal in their lives. If you want to be certified as a Nobel scientist, you will bury your life in research and books. Certification gives people some goals in their lives. It is an evidence to see one's effort or ability. If you graduate with 4.0 GPA, in most cases, you work harder or more talented than  the one who gets 2.0 GPA. However, as some of you discussed above, certification is mainly for rich kids, for the ones who can afford exorbitant tuition fees, for the ones who can pay for expensive prep courses. I have a lot of smart classmates. However, they couldn't study in the US because their parents earn about USD 5000/year. Certification may be a destructive force to the noble purposes of education. Some students, who are not really passionate with Math or Finance, still want to enroll to Business school because they want to earn money. Lots of high school students do community services or become leaders not because they want to do it. They just want to polish their CV. To me, success is something you define for yourself. If you have a cetification from Havard but have a meaningless life, Harvard degree is just a piece of paper.

alesnick's picture

individual vs. collective purposes?

This post helpfully focuses attention on the individual, meaning-centered dimensions of certification.  I wonder too about the public dimensions: it seems that certification is a means of assuring some attainment of capability when situations are impersonal.  I have a friend whose job includes verifying the certifications of doctors working in the hospital where she works.  Do you think this is important?

nbnguyen's picture

Certification is an unfair tool for success

I am very interested in your discussion about the role of certification in personal success. Certification may be regarded as an award or an incentive for people to give the best effort. If you want to be certified as a college student, it is obvious that you will work much harder than someone who does not have a goal in their lives. If you want to be certified as a Nobel scientist, you will bury your life in research and books. Certification gives people some goals in their lives. It is an evidence to see one's effort or ability. If you graduate with 4.0 GPA, in most cases, you work harder or more talented than  the one who gets 2.0 GPA. However, as some of you discussed above, certification is mainly for rich kids, for the ones who can afford exorbitant tuition fees, for the ones who can pay for expensive prep courses. I have a lot of smart classmates. However, they couldn't study in the US because their parents earn about USD 5000/year. Certification may be a destructive force to the noble purposes of education. Some students, who are not really passionate with Math or Finance, still want to enroll to Business school because they want to earn money. Lots of high school students do community services or become leaders not because they want to do it. They just want to polish their CV. To me, success is something you define for yourself. If you have a cetification from Havard but have a meaningless life, Harvard degree is just a piece of paper.

Martin L King Jr.'s picture

I feel as though you

I feel as though you shouldn't have to pay for a role in society , nor should you have to be certified in order to be successful. Why should you have to be certified in order to be successful? Just because you have a piece of paper that says your certified for something doesn't make you smarter then another person in society that knows the same subject that you majored in. It just means that you had the chance to further your education because you had the funds or nothing to hold you back from receiving your education, unlike most people in our generations these days because of the debts we are in as a nation and the choices we are forced to make by our government . So that stops most middle class families from furthering their educations, and then it continues as a repeating process. But if we all had the chance to show to the world that we are all actually smart without being certified by a piece of paper(college diploma),then society would hopefully consider giving every one the equal opportunity to achieve any career we choose to. But it just takes time, one extra voice just make our fight against society stronger.

thamid's picture

I completely agree with the

I completely agree with the post above. I mean it is only a piece of paper telling you that you are "more qualified" than someone else. Money does seem to play a major role in receiving a piece of paper that qualifies someone towards their particular success. Maybe a degree does show that one had the funds to further their education. But what do you think about the people on scholarship? They do not always have the money, but still further their education.  If we do not need certification, what other ways can we further our education/successes and how will people know that we are capable of being qualified?

JHarmon's picture

When I read this, I instantly

When I read this, I instantly thought about how much society has changed since my parents' generation. My step mom often talks about her progression from a college drop out to a top managerial position at Cornell. While the story is always inspiring, it seems as though it belongs in a different world. Today I often hear that "the Masters is the new Bachelors." It seems as though students and families need to keep pumping more time, energy, and resources into education than ever before. Gone are the days when a college drop out had a chance for mobility. In MOST cases, education and training are absolutely crucial if one seeks upward mobility. 

So, this is what we're talking about when we need to prove that we are qualified. It's clear that college drop outs and non-college educated people have the ability to be trained and succeed. If  they DIDN'T have this ability, people like my step mom would not exist. However, in today's society, we need the slip of approval that tells employers we're worth hiring--it "puts the money where our mouth is."

In the end, I agree with both of you. A diploma does not necessarily prove intelligence, it just proves that you took the proper steps in "the system." Much like Will in Good Will Hunting (it's an AWESOME movie if you haven't seen it), the smartest people go unnoticed without the credentials to prove it. 

Lastly (sorry this is so long), I absolutely agree that we need to further our education even if we are not in college! Furthering your education isn't associated with college at all! There are TONS of resources out there if you want to learn something. In high school, I always looked at a list of online learning links and tried to learn a little bit more about things I didn't have to opportunity to know about (like economics and sociology). 

Here's a website with some great links about furthering your education (I can't find the one I normall use, but this one is okay): http://selfmadescholar.com/b/self-education-resource-list/

alesnick's picture

another self-directed learning website

Thanks for showing us selfmadescholar.com!  Another in this area is www.uncollege.org.

 

Chandrea's picture

Response to JHarmon

When I read the quote, "the Masters is the new Bachelors" I just about died a little on the inside. That statement only confirmed my fears. I'm the first in my family to go to college and I have yet to survive my first year here at Bryn Mawr. Before I discovered that I would be able to attend college, I had never even heard of a Masters Degree or the concept of furthering one's education after college. It was never discussed in my household. My plan was to graduate out of high school, go to college, and get a job. And now that I think of it, I might have to change my plans! I might not even get a job. I wish I could say I'm enthusiastic about the thought of going to graduate school but I really don't feel that way. One, I doubt I'll have the money to get me through graduate school, and two, it's just too much schooling. Like, when do I actually get to live, and have real life experiences instead of sitting in a class?

Learning is fun and all and it's supposed to be a life-long experience, blah-di-blah, but I'm starting to get sick of the thought of furthering my education and not gaining any success from it. Sure, I can brag about all the years I've gone to school and I can flaunt the degree I received but what's the point if I don't have the job to put it to use? It's like owning an ostentatious sports car with no keys to it. I think what I'm also struggling with is that I've planned my future out so carefully, so I can stay afloat and it's starting to exhaust me. I've noticed that a lot of kids my age go to college, like there's no other option. I think it's okay if one chooses not to go the traditional path. If I had the money, I would've taken a gap year and travelled. If only I had the money.

Ralph Abernathy's picture

Somebody in my class said ''

Somebody in my class said '' you dont have to pay to live in this soceity''. So I said that you have to pay for everything in this world, so I gave so examples, like that people have to pay tax and some people have to pay mortgage. Then she said that ''you dont have to pay for a education''. First I look at her and then said so you dont have to pay for school if dont have a sholarship. She said that I'm going to get a sholarship. So my response was that even you get a sholarship you still have tp pay for your room, then stop before she could say anything else that even if you a full ride to college that you still have to pay for your books. college does not have that kind of money to just be pay for any kid, and paying for everything. Some people just have a different view on life but most dont say anything like that.

S. Yaeger's picture

You bring up some really

You bring up some really great points about the real cost of attending college, even if one is getting financil aid and scholarships.  I am the first person in my family to attend college (though my younger brother does have a degree from a tech school).  When I was 18, my parents could not afford to keep a roof over our heads, my brother in his special ed program, and pay for me to attend college.  However, they made enough money so that I was not elligible for aid.  I ended up spending one very unsuccessful semester paying my own way through community college while working 30 hours a week in a restaurant and 20 hours at a retail shop.  I ended up dropping out and travelling and working for 10 years before going back to school when my family's income would not be counted against my need for aid.  Now, in order to get the aid I need, I have to work as little as possible, and just stretch money as far as I can. I am extremely grateful for the opportunity I have been given, but it as been very difficult.  There are many hidden costs in attending college.  For instance, you mentioned text books, which are insanely expenisve, and there is also transportation, food, supplies, computers (it's virtually impossible to attend a four year school without one), clothes, shoes, and recreation. At the end of it all, there's a very good chance that I may not even get a higher paying job after I get my degree than I had before.

However, since everything does cost money, and since working is a part of life where you will spend at least 40 hoours a week for 40-60 years, I think that it is worth it to really consider the kind of job that will make you feel good about who you are and what you have contributed to the world at the end of the day.  Without a degree of some sort, it is very difficult to get a job where you are giving anything of value to others, or one were you are not being looked down upon.  I have had many, many, many different jobs over the course of my life, from washing dishes in a restaurant to working in an office for a fortune 500 company, and they have all left me feeling frustrated, wasted, lonley, and unfulfilled. I have had all of my financial needs satisfied by some of these jobs, but they were not worth it.  That is why paying to get a degree is worth it to me.  Plus, college has given me the opportunity to find people who want to do the same things I want to do, and people who want to help me do them.

This is not to say that paying for a degree is worth it for everybody, or that what I want is better, but that there are benefits to getting a degree that surpass the financial, and that there are costs which are difficult to explain as well.  

Madame C.J. Walker's picture

I disagree because I believe

I disagree because I believe that you do not have to be certified to be successful in life.

Utitofon's picture

Yes in some disciplines, you

Yes in some disciplines, you can push through without the overpriced piece of paper - the diploma. Especially if you are self-employed, for e.g you dont need to be certified to start a blog and get followership, to open a confectionery or a sewing shop etc. However, if you are to get good business and i mean not trifles from once in a week customers,lets say you want the contract to manage an event, from the catering to the room decoration, unless you have strong recommendations, the person whose culinery and organizational skills pale in comparison to yours but who has a certification in project management is likely to get the contract, because  that paper is legal proof that she can do it. In fact, that she has experienced in doing it. So to roll in the big bucks, rather than peanuts, to do business with the government or private companies for example, you cannot help but obtain that certification. That is why we experience this immense pressure to pay beyond our noses to add some title in front of or behind their names.

Maya Angelou's picture

I think you should pay to

I think you should pay to roll in society because everything in life you have to put out money to make more money. Being certified can get you more in life and also give you some pride in yourself.

Hummingbird's picture

This is a really interesting

This is a really interesting suggestion, but I worry this might not always be the case. What about students who come from very wealthy families and don't need to work while in college in order to attend? Do you think they feel the same level of pride in getting their bachelor's degree? Do you think students who do need to work at a job while studying might feel some resentment towards those who only need to focus on one of those things? 

My class had a discussion on the blackboard recently in which one student said that college was a privilege, but I don't think that's fair if that kind of certification is needed to be successful or get a stable job. The problem is that if we keep thinking of college as a privilege people will be less likely to see a problem in the fact that not very many can afford it. What do you think?

Aretha Franklin's picture

Your role in society

You have to pay to have a role in society because you have to give (money) to receive more (money) and the more (money) you give the more (money) you receive. That to me isn't fair, the amount of money people spend on a piece of paper that says you are certified in something should not measure you success in life.

Utitofon's picture

Nevertheless, our society

Nevertheless, our society runs on money and is structured to make it next to impossible for you to live comfortably without it. Money is such a divider of society. Money exerts such a strong pull because it gives us the lee-way to do and undo to a large extent. Remember "what you give is what you get" It is unreasonable to expect that those who have invested so much to improve their lot will agree that someone who invested nothing should be treated equally. I for one would expect that after all the stress of college, i should be placed on a higher starting salary than someone who only graduated high school. So lets look at both sides of the coin.That is not to overlook the unfairness that exist, like the current situation in the States, whereby the richest are taxed the least. How ironic? 

Zora Neale Hurston's picture

I disagree with this

I disagree with this statement. Some people may say money decides how much power you'll have. It all depends on how you really define success. Personality success isn't having all the money in the world or having a huge house with 12 different cars. To me, success is reaching your number one goal in life. Paying to be certified is something extra some people will be willing to do. If I have a goal set and I achieve that goal to the best of my ability, then yes i do believe that is success.

LJ's picture

  I believe one of the main

 

I believe one of the main pit falls in the U.S. education system is the fact that college is outrageously expensive. Even though financial aid does help as someone earlier mentioned there are lots of hidden costs. Activities dues, books, meal plan, and plenty of other things are just a few of the hidden costs of getting a college degree. I was reading in the Bryn Mawr newspaper and one girl was discussing the fact that she was worried that she might not be able to pay her final payment before graduation. The fact that she has to worry about that inhibiting her from receiving her diplomas instead of her grades is sad. I think the U.S. should adopt a system similar to that in France were college is free. However, by doing this there would be more competition to get into college but it would allow the people who really want to get an education to be able to. There is no perfect system but I believe individuals should not have to pay for education they should have to work for it.

Jackie-Joyner Kersee's picture

The reson why you should pay

The reson why you should pay your debt to society is because without you paying your dues to society you will lose your respect and no matter what way you look at it you will still end up doing your part at the end of the day and you might have done it.

snatarajan's picture

This is a good point that you

This is a good point that you bring up about society's views and pressures that define what is and is not expected of its individuals. I feel that by bringing this up, you're adding another layer to this discussion. Because I agree with this comment, I want to ask you what you would instruct someone to do if they were incapable of paying this debt to society. If they didn't have the resources, the access, or the tools with which they could do this, how do you think they might be able to still contribute to society? Or do you think it is impossible for them to if they do not pay this debt? Also, I think something we can think about is whether the expectation of having a debt that must be paid off is somewhat based on the background from which each person comes and whether this expectation of "doing your part at the end of the day" really means something completely different in different situations and settings.

HSBurke's picture

Hi there. Thanks for posting.

Hi there. Thanks for posting. What I'd like to know is what you mean by "pay your debt to society." The way I see it, choosing whether or not to become "certified" in terms of receiving a degree is left up to the individual. The way society is structured may encourage us to pursue a higher education, but this is not something we owe to anyone. Do you think we lose respect by not going to college or being certified? I think that looking at the road we are on, in the future it will be expected for the majority of people to go to college. Even now, we tend to hold those with only a high-school education or less in lower esteem. But this is a generalized trap that society has fallen into. Both my parents do not have college degrees, and I in no way feel superior to them because I am able to receive what they couldn't. They are both successful business people now and have had no issues making a spot for themselves because of their lack of certification. However, like I said before, times are changing. I find myself wondering why it has become the norm to expect most people to go to college. Is it any easier to receive an education now than it was 20 years ago? Or is the case of a new standard that we hold ourselves up to? 

Ida Wells-Barnett's picture

Facing Reality

A classmate said you don't have to pay to get a role in society,but if you dont pay how are you going to get a good job? how far are you going to go with a high school degree? Inorder to get a great job or a career you have to pay, whether you invest your time or money your still paying because nothing in life comes free.

Michaela's picture

This is a very interesting

This is a very interesting idea--I think it is very true that sometimes, time is worth even more than money, and paying in time can feel even more expensive than other modes of payment. How do we decide what to prioritize in the day, and how to stretch time enough to do everything we need to? I know that a lot of people who work and are in classes while at school feel stretched pretty thin, because then where do they get a break, a time to enjoy their time with friends and classmates? In this respect, it is often the unfortunate truth that those without much money or time end up paying in both. Getting a job or career is one thing, but what about just having a life that is comparable in quality to those of peers who do not have to pay so dearly in money/time?

Crystal Bird Fauset's picture

I don't think you always have

I don't think you always have to be certified, I think you just have to have an education to be successful in life. You don't always have to pay to make it in society. Yes you'll have to pay for college and when you're an adult you have to pay bills and do taxes but you don't have to be certified. Be good at what you do and you can be successful that way. People will look up to you for being you not for being someone you are for other people.

Utitofon's picture

I agree with you. I respect

I agree with you. I respect those who are able to swim against he current. I have a friend, very smart who was pressured by teachers, parents and even myself to go to college and study Medecine - cause she was a science student and was good at it. But she withstood all that pressure and went on to learn how to sew - her real passion. That gives her time to devote to her greater vocation as a volunteer Bible teacher. Now she may not have everything that she wants, but she certainly has what she needs. It requires the strength of steel and the absence of "greed" to make such a decision. I mean greed as in the desire to enjoy certain pleasures of life, not greed in the negative sense. You have to be ready to live a simple life, and not dream of vacations in Hawaii, of summer homes or smartphones . Unfortunately,  the media makes us think we need those things to 'really' live - so the stampede for certification to get a job to afford them. Yet it is not a straightforward equation.

Edward Alexander Bouchet's picture

Thank you for understanding

Thank you for understanding where i'm coming from , The biggest point that you made that I took note on is when you said " Unfortunately , the media makes us think we need those things to really live - so stampede for certification to get a job to afford them." That's what makes every kid have bigger and bigger dreams every day . We see incredible things on tv that costs alot of money and it makes us believe that, that is the only way to live . Things I see on television fantacizes me and makes me wanna have a big house , nice cars , have alot of jewelry . But alot of those artists and people on tv don't have high levels of education . I have one question what is the highest level of a degree you can achieve in Criminal Justice ? Also if their is any taking the Crimnal Justice path could they contact me soon as possible .

HSBurke's picture

Dear Edward,  Good to hear

Dear Edward, 

Good to hear from you! It's really awesome to see that you are focused on following the path of criminal justice! I did some research and found many PhD programs that you can pursue if you are interested (I'd suppose that's the highest you can go). Here's the link for those: http://criminaljusticeonlineblog.com/01/best-phd-doctorate-criminal-justice-schools-programs/

Hope this helps and I will keep on the lookout for anyone I know who many have similar interests so I can connect you. 

Utitofon's picture

Thanks for stepping in

Thanks for stepping in Freckles.

Crystal Bird Fauset's picture

To Be Certified Or Not To Be

I mean I was talking out of common sense because I know the things I wanna do in life and I don't want to pay to get there. I know that you will have to pay sometimes but to get fame and wealth will just drive a person crazy. I don't want to be like those people, I don't want to have to pay for being who I want to be or doing what I want to do,it's just crazy.

George Washington Carver's picture

i think paying for education

i think paying for education is important because the more you pay the higher education you have, and the higher the better life you have or job.

Crystal Bird Fauset's picture

What if you have a full ride

What if you have a full ride scholarship and you won't have to worry about paying for college? I want to make it in life without having to pay for some things.

mary christmas 's picture

happy new years

I believe that college is not always needed for a successful life because i know some people that are very successful and they haven't finished high school or gone to college yet . The money that they make is more then the people i know that have their bachelors.

Serena's picture

While I agree that college is

While I agree that college is not necessary for success (especially if you define it in terms other than money or formal education), one thing that has to be considered when saying that a person makes more money than another is how much money they will be making in 5, 10, 20 years. For example, when I was working at a deli I made around $200/wk, which is much more than I make now as a college student on my work-study job, and maybe once I get my degree I'll still be making less money than that, if I can find a job at all. However, after a few years in my field, I will be more likely "climbing the ladder" - get raises and promotions based on my performance - than someone in a dead-end deli job. Sure, they could eventually become the district manager or something akin to that, but ultimately to get a professional job within the company they would need a degree or some kind of certification. Is this fair? Not necessarily, but that is unfortunately how it is.

"Shotgun" Mary Fields's picture

I believe that in some cases

I believe that in some cases having the documents to justify that you know what your doing is good. But in some other cases its pointless. Such as fast food careers, were i do not think you should have a bachelors or masters in anything to know what your doing. But careers such as those in the medical field should have the degrees and certifications to show that they know what their doing, knowing that it takes hard work and the actual learning of the subjects to earn a degree.

meggiekate's picture

I agree that there are

I agree that there are certainly some careers where a degree is absolutely necessary (like the medical field), but I also think that jobs in the fast food industry, and really any job with customer service, require some sort of training in order for someone to be good at their job. I worked as a waitress this past year and while I needed no degrees to be qualified for my job, I certainly needed some training to know how to perform my job well, especially for dealing with certain situations with customers. 

In regards to paying for a role in society, "paying" does not necessarily mean giving money. People pay in other ways, like in time and effort. Personally, I think this type of payment is worth more than money and should be valued more than it is currently in society. Also, I think paying, or just contributing something, to participate in society should be necessary for those who are able to pay or contribute in some way. I think it's part of the argreement we make by living together. 

Sam Saludades's picture

I agree that it is important

I agree that it is important for people to get certified for jobs. Certification enables the provider to be deemed that he is credible and has the expertise in a certain field so that those who he is serving are able to trust that they are getting a certain quality of service. You wouldn't want an uncertified doctor to do surgery on a patient because you cannot trust that he knows the knowledge or has the skills needed to perform well. Now, I'm not saying that being certified is necessarily for people to be successful or that even that the person who is certified is successful. I just think degrees, in theory, can act as a good measurement for credibility and helps as steps in achieving a certain goal (eg. getting a degree in medical school in order to become a good doctor).

In regards to 'paying for a role or a certification in society: first of all, the way I see it, I think certification is a product of education. In order to be certified for a job or certain service, individuals need to develop qualifications and skills in order to be deemed certified which usually means taking classes to learn to do the job correctly or a test to determine whether an individual knows the material needed for the job. In consideration to this correlation between certification and education, I think everyone should have the equal opportunity to be certified; however, this also means that an individual's socio-economic status and wealth should not create separate privileges that enable them to utilize their money to 'pay' for their education and certification without working just as hard. In the end, I guess what I'm saying is that I find certification to be somewhat synonymous with education.

Louis Armstrong 's picture

You must pay to get a role in

You must pay to get a role in society. You must pay to attend college after you graduate from high school. An by attending college shows that your what to further your education which may help you change society in some way. Like a lawyer, doctor and a teacher would for example. But jobs may pick you on your skills and not your education in same case. But just to get the interview you most likely would need so form of proof that you have some type of education.

MVW1993's picture

You bring up some very good

You bring up some very good points here. Especially interesting to me is the idea that having a degree is a form of proof that you have some education and that it is a means of getting an interview for a job, but that it can only take you so far - in the end it is your actual skills that will get you the job over that piece of paper. I also think that we need to keep in mind though, the experience and education gained from earning that degree. In theory, the degree symbolizes all of the knowledge that you have in that particular field of study and represents the skill that you have with that subject. Do you think it is possible though, that someone may have earned their degree but may not have actually acquired the skills and knowledge that it represents?

You also bring up the idea that you have to pay to attend college. In many ways this would be a class privilege - for having the money to attend college makes it much easier to do so. Do you think there are benefits to having to work one's way through college though? Furthermore, do you think there is a way for society to make it easier for lower-income students to go to college and have a shot at that degree that often seems so necessary for one to even be considered for a decent paying job?

Lucy Terry's picture

I think the more you pay for

I think the more you pay for your education, the more knowledge you would get and getting a degree will get you a better job, no doubts about it. People should pay for their education because with that education, they will make a lot of money.

gfeliz's picture

I think that to a certain

I think that to a certain extent, all college educations are equally expensive and not all expensive educations are worth it. The money that some student's families have to pay sometimes do not go towards the academics and the knowledge we can obtain-- it goes towards making the athletic fields better, buying new plasma TVs for the dining halls or the gym, and so on. I think that the more money you spend for an education varies on what it goes towards. I would like to think our education but sometimes that is not the case...

Ultimately, why do we have to pay thousands of dollars just to get a degree for a career we are passionate about and willing to pursue? Not all of us have that kind of money. It just makes no sense to me sometimes...

Chuck Berry 's picture

Why must you pay to get a role in Society?

I think the reason for paying to get a role in society is to basically make an investment.Also i think is it part of responsibility.If people put they money into sometime, it in a greater possibility for them to stick to it and be more committed.If it was free, i don't think people would actually be so serious about it.When people pay for something they feel like they have to finish it since they started it.

gladys night 's picture

I think that you must pay to

I think that you must pay to have a role in society because , in order for you to have a role you must be smart at what your intending to do. For an example you have to pay too attend to college and when you are out of college you are hopefully eligible for a job , which puts you in the society because you are working.

Angela Davis's picture

I honestly dont know how to

I honestly dont know how to answer this question. I actually want to know the same thing. Although I'm not in college yet I never planned on going because i don't even see the point of paying thousands of dollars, knowing most likely i wont be able to pay it back. I'm going to college to get degrees in a field where there's not even a guarantee that I'm going to get a job with the economy we have today.

mary Mcleod Bethune's picture

yes i do agree with that

yes i do agree with that statement because in order to have success you need power and money gives you power and also when you go to college and graduate and you go out in the working world your money comes from your diploma

Phillis Wheatly's picture

Certification

A degree is mainly used to display a certain type of success and a person role in society. However, what people declare as smart and as idiotic is based on their level of education. The thing about this is some parts of success can not be classified by a degree and just shows a person want to inquire more knowledge but that is all. What it shows people is "I had money to pay for my education instead of not caring" but a person can still not be completely accepted in their role in society.

Rosa Parks's picture

OMG, I really hope that

OMG, I really hope that college isn't a waste of time. I can't reach my career goals without going to college though, so I suppose that it will help me in some way. In the end, I just want to have a job doing what I love. Money shouldn't matter. But in a world like this one, money is extremely important..

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