kgould's blog

kgould's picture

ORLAN & Frankenstein, Part 2: Beauty and DNA

kgould's picture

ORLAN and Frankenstein, Part One

kgould's picture

TITS OR GTFO: Why Everyone, Girls Included, Should Play Video Games

 Tits or GTFO: Why Everyone, Girls Included, Should Play Video Games

            The Women & Gaming Study done in 2010 by the Lifetime network, and AETN Digital Media showed that women play online more than men (55% vs 45%), women play more frequently during the day (whereas men play for a longer duration and typically at the end of the day), and most women like to play solo (83%) [1]. Girls are gaming and their numbers are ever increasing in their use of browser games, social games (like those found on Facebook), and MMORPGs (Massively Multiplayer Online Roleplaying Games).

kgould's picture

Our Minds Were Made for Mergers

Our Minds Were Made for Mergers// an exploration of what it means to be human and cyborg using Ghost in the Shell, Beyond Human, and Andy Clark

kgould's picture

Shift, Observe, Engage

 Shift, Observe, and Engage

kgould's picture

FACTS DON'T EXIST//A GRAPHIC EXPERIMENT

Here are the links to my final project, "FACTS DON'T EXIST," a small graphic experiment on story-telling, comic books, and non-fiction prose.

Images are on DeviantArt because of file size issues.

 

FACTS DON'T EXIST Gallery
Page 1

Page 2

kgould's picture

What is Science Writing?

 What is Science Writing?

(And Why Does The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks Not Count?)

 Having been in Facing Facts, a course on non-fiction prose, it seems silly to propose that there are any definite characteristics that make something Science Writing. We have been barely able to say, for certain, what makes something non-fiction—other than not being fiction—and if Science Writing is not fiction, what does that mean?

kgould's picture

Spontaneous Thought is to Genetic Mutation as Learning is to Evolution

Spontaneous Thought is to Genetic Mutation as Learning is to Evolution

 

Spontaneity in the Classroom:

kgould's picture

Thrill of Disaster, Thrill of Fight or Flight

 Thrill of Disaster, Thrill of Fight or Flight

A professor asked me at the beginning of the year why I enjoyed horror films so much. I watch them regularly, of all different qualities and sub-genres, and I plan on writing my senior English thesis on zombie films and the human unconscious. Why would I want to watch such terrible, terrifying, and often gruesome narratives—especially when the “real” world is disturbing enough on its own?

Syndicate content