Lyndsey C's blog

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Knocking on New Doors :A Review of Mind Wide Open

          Fortunately for many of us, studying neurobiology doesn’t have to be rocket science. In fact, it’s merely brain science! According to Steven Johnson, author of Mind Wide Open, studying the brain is best approached with an open mind (pun intended). At times, it may be difficult to comprehend the various complex processes which are occurring within our skulls each day. Furthermore, it is often a challenge to relate such knowledge to our everyday lives. Johnson’s book attempts to make this journey a little less arduous, however, by colloquially explaining several salient brain processes in a way that inexperienced readers can understand and appreciate without much confusion.

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Our Brains Have Chemistry: What’s Love Got to Do, Got to Do With It?

            Love is a wonderful phenomenon that almost everyone can relate to despite the challenging, perhaps even impossible task of defining it or describing its many different interpretations and implications. Curiously, the multi-dimensional construct of love leaves many of us with pressing questions, one of which involves the obvious notion that love must somehow be influenced by internal mechanisms, but which ones and how? Logically, it has been stated that love functions biologically to ensure the survival of a species through social attachment and reproduction, so it is no surprise that science has found great interest in

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A New Pitch on ALS: Striking Out Lou Gehrig’s Disease

        “Today, I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth." Even if you’re not a big fan of baseball, you’re probably familiar with this unforgettable quote, stated by the legendary Lou Gehrig on July 4, 1939 as he addressed an admiring crowd honoring his achievements on Lou Gehrig Appreciation Day. Indeed, “The Iron Horse’s”

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The Ambiguous Anatomy of Autism: Explorations in Current Neurobiological Research

The ever expanding fields of neuroscience and behavioral science often intersect in an attempt to discover the cause of many psychological disorders, a process which subsequently helps direct improvements in treatment techniques. Today, researchers have expressed an emerging interest regarding the source of one of the most commonly diagnosed developmental disorders known as autism which, since its discovery in 1943, continues to possess many mysterious qualities that have yet to be unearthed by empirical research. In particular, one presently debated argument regarding autism is aimed at confirming specific brain abnormalities which may subsequently cause or have an effect on the disorder. Though

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