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Emerging Genres Part 2

    I must admit that yesterday’s discussion regarding science fiction left me somewhat puzzled because I know very little about science fiction. I would not mind reading something in this genre, I could understand it better if read something and draw conclusions or come up with definitions of what science-fiction is on my own. As mentioned previously, some of our discussions could be based on audiobooks; some people can understand texts better when they simply listen to them versus just reading them.  

I have never read any of the selections mentioned in class but after some research I suggest the following:

1-"The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks"

2-Octavia Butler’s “Kindred”

    Going from one genre to another would work best if we discuss one text per week so that we can post our thoughts over the weekend, the discussion can always continue online if some additional thoughts come up throughout the week. We can always take a few minutes every couple of days to see if there have been additions to our previous discussion.

 

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Feedback and Emerging Genres

 

            I have enjoyed the discussions we have had these past couple of weeks. What I think works best for the benefit of the class is using Serendip as a tool to establish discussion topics for upcoming classes. In addition to that, I like the fact that Anne is a part of our discussion and encourages us to come with additional thoughts and questions to the next class. What I would like to format from the course’s structure is the amount of time we spend discussing a text, I think it would be best if we reduce the amount of texts per week to analyze them further. This format would allow us to re-read a text if necessary and give room to multiple interpretations based on class discussions. If I had the opportunity to go back and spend more time discussing texts, I would like to read Margaret Price’s ”Mad at School”(especially after having her in class).

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Endless possibilities

During our discussion of McCloud’s Understanding Comics, it was debated that the use of images could hinder the way we interpret a story. I partially agree with this argument because I think “gutters” are elements that foster the use of our imagination rather than limit it. Although images are explicit transitions from one event to the next, what happens in each “gutter” that separates them allows us to estimate the duration and perhaps the nature of an event etc. Using “gutters” to our advantage can allow us to reach a middle ground between the explicit use of images and our overactive imaginations.

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Are pictures really worth a thousand words?

I am looking forward to reading and analyzing graphic novels. From my past encounters with graphic novels, (“The Good Neighbors” by Holly Black) (The Spderwick Chronicles). I feel that I gain a better understanding  of the text if it includes an image(s), I find it less tedious at times. Images can do a great job at capturing gestures but I find that the more precise images are, the less authors could be most likely to omit words. Are pictures really worth a thousand words?  Will it affect all genres?

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Are we really reading?

    With academic writing morphing into a genre on the web, we mostly read assigned texts from our computer. I decided to use reading the course assignments online as part of an experiment to test my ability to concentrate. Turns out I prefer to read the course material from a piece of paper instead of a computer screen because I grasp the material quicker and gain a better understanding. As previously mentioned in class, reading from our computers often leads to going in and out of multiple websites which means we are not able to give our assigned readings the undivided attention they deserve. I ask myself: Are we program to give text on a piece of paper more authority, esteem and attention? If so, we must acknowledge that the online publication of academic writing is gaining appraisal from the scholarly community and that we must modify how we perceive reading in this medium.  

     It is all a matter of time for me (as the writer), for you (whoever is reading this right now), for us (as a class)…

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Academia in 140 Characters

Academia in 140 Characters

    With all the advances in technology we have come to naming social media a genre within our writing. Social media is an instrument of communication that allows its audience to interact with one another by sharing content etc.  A website that has recently caught my attention has been Twitter due to the fact I have not used it before and know very little about it. In order to conduct my research and express my thoughts on how it can become an active member of the academic community, I had to acquire a new identity and immerse myself on Twitter as @alicia_ramirez3. Once a member of the Twitter community, I was given a minute-long introduction to what Twitter is, what  “tweets” , or messages, are, choose different categories from musicians to newspapers so you can start obtaining feeds with information as it is being published as well as finding out if any friends from your email address book have a Twitter account.

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Week 1 Post

  For as far as I can remember, academic writing has been driven by extensive research (from the writer and sometimes the readers after reading the essay) and supported evidence. Academic writing may allow writers to present their opinions as long as they do not overshadow the facts. Although academic writing requires additional research, I strongly believe that some disciplines (Science vs. Humanities) are more open to having a writer’s opinion complement research. 

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