Questions Arising Along the Way

Anne Dalke's picture

I'm setting up this forum as a place where we can talk outloud together about various questions that might arise "along the way," but which might not fit neatly into one of the week's assignments.

 

 

gail's picture

Thank you and more navigation questions

Dear Ann,

Thank you for your help in posting images and links.

I had created a sculpture in response to last week's class and wanted to take the risk of sharing, but did not know how.  Thanks.

 Further query-

Did you record today's class.  How can we get there.  I have your links for the papers and last week's recording. Is that the way, you will give us specific links.  Are you going to continue to record class.

How do you save the downloaded mp3 file. Can you.  It would be convenient to have it on my local hard drive and bring it up.  I could then listen to class in several segments, scrubbing through what I had already listened. Maybe like being able to upload photos, I just don't know how.

Can we access each other's blogs or do we have to post a link to the blog from the forum.  How do we do that.  I know one of the undergrads did last week.

Thanks for your support and help

Gail

 

Ann Dixon's picture

mp3 files

Hi Gail,

First, thank you so much for sharing your amazing sculptures! I am thrilled the class is so
creatively generative for you.

Yes, I recorded the class. I will continue to record them and the recordings will be posted in the 
password protected area where the readings are. 

Yes, you can save the mp3 files for later listening (and fast forwarding). How you do it depends on 
whether you are using a Mac or PC. 
On a PC, you rightclick the link to the audio file, and you will see an option to save the file. 
On the Mac,  you hold down the control key on the keyboard as you click on the link to the audio, 
and then choose the option Save target As.

The undergrads blogs are all listed on the web paper page, linked from their usernames. 
I will need to think of a way to make alum blogs more accessible since I hadn't planned on 
alum blogging to happen (so happy that it has).

Ann 

 

gail's picture

Thanks and another question

Dear Ann,

Thank you for helping me with downloading the class mp3s.  I just KNEW you would have the answer....and... so simple!

Now...

How do I print out the new class schedule of part II.  When I print out the "home" page I get the sidebar, intro, then nothing. It just stops.

Please help me yet again.

Thanks for your patience,

Gail

gail's picture

Posting photos etc

Dear Ann,

How do I post photos and links?

Thanks for your attention.

 

Ann Dixon's picture

creating a link in your post

When you're writing a posting (and are logged in -- anonymous postings do not allow links because of spam), use your mouse to "select"/highlight the text that you want to appear as a link. Then, click on the icon that looks like a chain link. Fill in the URL (needs to include http://) and then click on Insert. 

Happy linking,

Ann 

Ann Dixon's picture

using images with your post

Hi Gail,

There are two ways to add images, and the method you use depends on whether the image is 
somewhere on the web already or if you need to upload it to Serendip.

If you are using an image that's already somewhere on the web:
when writing your posting, look for the little icon that looks like a green tree. When your cursor is where you want the image, click on the tree, enter a URL/address of where the image is, and click on Insert.

Caveats:

1. Many images on the web are copyrighted, so please be sure that what you use is not restricted. 

2. Give credit by giving the URL of the original image.

3. Be careful that the image isn't so huge that it causes your page to load slowly.

If you are uploading your own image to Serendip:
when writing your posting, cllick on the icon that looks like a camera. Then click on Upload and 
select the options that you want (size, etc). 

Caveat:

Does not work with all browsers. 

 

Ann 

Ann Dixon's picture

about blogs and their relation to forums

HOW DO I FIND MY BLOG?
You have a blog on Serendip, and it can be accessed at an address that
lists all of your blog postings in reverse chronological order. It is in
the form:

http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/blog/275

where the number is your unique identifier on Serendip's Exchange. From
it, you can tell how many people have gotten accounts before you!

HOW DO I POST ON MY BLOG?
When you login, and go to your blog's address, you will see a link at the
top, "Post new blog entry." Click on the link, and away you go.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MY BLOG AND THE FORUM?
Your blog is all your writing, with comments appended by others. The forum
is organized by topic and thread by the professor.

WHEN SHOULD I USE THE BLOG VS THE FORUM?
The forum is specifically for dialog, so the posts there should be
(relatively) short and are about specific topics. There is a lot of
latitude about how short is short and about whether posts are on topic or
not. The blog, on the other hand, is a place to develop your own thinking,
and where others can read what you're thinking about. The undergrads, for
instance, are going to write the papers for the class on their blogs.

I'M GETTING INTO THIS BLOGGING AND THE COURSE WILL BE OVER SOON. WHAT NEXT?
Feel free to stay and keep blogging. Serendip's Exchange accounts are only
closed if they are inactive, not because of a course ending.

I'M READY TO TELL THE WORLD ABOUT MY BLOG. HOW DO I DO THAT?
You can give others your blog's address. You can also give others a link
to your blog's RSS feed, which is in the form:

http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/blog/275/feed

And you can register your blog at a place called Technorati,
http://technorati.com/, which helps other people find interesting blogs.

WHAT IS AN RSS FEED?
A one page description is available here:

http://www.whatisrss.com/

Basically, it's the way for you to become a blog publisher, and others to
subscribe to your publication.
gail's picture

Printing

Dear Ann,

This is important info.  How do I print out a single posting.

Sorry to need so much help.

Gail

farquhard's picture

Learning

Deborah Anne Jones Farquhar '68
Having been the subject of providing experiential learning in several settings, I firmly believe it can be dangerous and even harmful, if the correct theory is not applied.  Theory enables us to arrive at the right conclusions, and concurrently maintain our interface with fresh perspectives--I think it is a process of absorption based on an informed background.
gammyflink's picture

Reply to Barbara Powell

   I agree that unless we're academics or in the field of women's studies, we're likely to move away from reading theoretical material.  I thrived on that kind of reading at Bryn Mawr, but now I prefer to learn in other ways.  However, I strongly disagree with describing young people as "callow youth".  We have experience and maturity to bring to the table, and they have the fresh perspective of youth which is just as valuable.  We are teaching and learning from each other.

Barbara  '57

  

Barbara Powell's picture

A Gap

Anne,
I see such a gap between story telling and theory. In fact, story telling is a blissful antidote to excessive (and often ponderous, incomprehensible and outlandish) theory.
Barbara

Anne Dalke's picture

Telling Stories in order to Revise Them = Theory?

Great question, Barbara! I hear the possible tension, but actually? when I co-teach the college seminar (a course designed for first-semester freshman) it's all about telling stories in order to revise them. It's a class full of skepticism, full of questioning, so actually it would work as a great lead-up to the students' taking critical feminist studies in the years after...

See http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/courses/csem/f07
for more details on "Storytelling as Inquiry: Questions, Intuitions, Revisions..."

Your other comparison -- between "reading fiction" and "theoretical approaches" -- is also one we'll be exploring in Critical Feminist Studies. The first 1/2 of the course we'll be reading contemporary theory. In the second, we'll shift into fictional representations of women's lives and questions. So all the students in the class will get to figure out which form works better, for them, in addressing the questions that concern us all.

Thanks for your interest in these things, and for asking me to clarify the relationship between my different courses, and the different parts of this particular course--

Anne


Deborah Jones Farquhar '68's picture

Reply to Professor Dalke about Theoretical Approaches

Thank you, Anne--that is exactly what the younger generation (and older as well, I might add) need, in my opinion--"how to apply theoretical approaches" to questions that concern us all. We also need to learn to distinguish between fact and fiction, between projection and reality, and our own inner controls, which define that amorphous "grey" area--our brain--and our responses. I look forward to participating.

Barbara Powell's picture

what's the difference betweeen critical theory and storytelling?

Dear Anne,
Why does "critical feminist theory" on the one hand and story telling on the other seem so contradictory? This course offering sounds fabulous, but unfortunately I won't be able to participate. Thanks for thinking of alumnae. I think a mature, experienced perspective would be great to add to the callow youth.

I'm actually more into reading fiction to understand women and life than into to theoretical approaches.

Good luck and thanks for opening the course to us.

Barbara Powell '62