Framing Our World: The Form of a Graphic Narrative

Shayna S's picture

graphic [graf-ik]

            1. giving a clear and effective picture; vivid

narrative [nar-uh-tive]

            1. a story or account of events, experiences, or the like whether true or fictitious

 

 

 

Please download the file here.

Please comment if it doesn't work (it's suppose to be a powerpoint file).

 

 

 

Comments

Anne Dalke's picture

Embedding?


Shayna--
It works, all right, though it was very complicated for me to manipulate, and so to follow and understand the page: making it large enough to read made it too hard to navigate; making it a navigate-able size made it too small to read. Those technicalities aside (!)

...this is very impressive: first-and-foremost, in format, in your ability to do what Scott McCloud and Waking Life do--construct a critique of a form in that form. (Let's talk some more about what is gained and lost via that sort of trick: Does it dis-able the distance necessary for critique? Or, contrary-wise, marry form and content in a way that teaches more effectively than such distanced might allow?)

This is impressive, too, in what you show: the necessary intermediality (my new word!) of frame, graphics and words; the ability of a frame to move; the ability of a sequence of pictures to shift from a close up to a pan out; the ability of words to become part of the action (wow! that word bubble that kills!).

I know you want to go on with this exploration for your final project, and I can't wait to see where it will take you. One dimension we might want to think-about and play-with together is that of formatting: might "frame," "words" and "pictures" all be embedded (for example) in the page that is "graphic narrative"? Why have you "framed" them side-by-side, when the resources of the internet would allow you to engage in embedding?

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