Questions, questions...

Anne Dalke's picture

You'll find here the photos I took during our visit to Eastern State y'day. Very evocative…and troubling.
So much to think through (for me as a Quaker, especially....), about a vision gone wrong in so many ways…

I didn't take any photos during the mural tour, though--in part because I found it hard to see, and assumed I could find better images on-line than I could take from the trolley. But there's lots more I'd like to discuss about that whole experience--from what it means to ride around on a trolley through poor neighborhoods (while being urged to "wave @ everyone!"); through getting off the trolley and viewing murals, while the neighbors are making music across the street; to what it really means to "make art that represents a community."

I'm hoping that Jody, Sarah and Uninhibited will be able tell us something about the process that went into making the mural about women's education, which they helped to create in the first 360°. I attended one of the early concepting sessions; saw Jody, Sarah and Jomaira and Sharaai posed @ work on the front page of the Alumnae Bulletin...

heard the finished project celebrated on the evening news; and used photographs I had taken of the mural to invite you all "behind the walls" of our own 360°. But now, fresh on the heels of our (somewhat problematice?) "restorative justice" mural tour, I'm curious to know much more about what the decision-making process like: How was the site selected? How was the design decided on? What "voices" were heard, what was "silenced," in creating this particular "vision"?

Looking forward to learning....

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Sarah's picture

Just wanted to quickly add

Just wanted to quickly add how when this picture was taken, at that very moment we joked about what a diverse group we were and how we should tell Bryn Mawr to put this picture on their website.  It was almost laughable when we got an email a few days later asking if this picture could be the cover of the alumni bulletin.  It was funny and really cool to hand this out to my family, and the benefits of this event really outway the cons for me, but I do not like to ignore the feeling that we were being a little exploited because we were a snap shot of a diverse group of people.

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