mental illness

An Active Mind's picture

Seeing Stigma

I am an English major interested in how literature tends to the mind and how the written word can come to both reveal and conceal issues of illness and health. This semester, with the assistance of Anne Dalke, I will be exploring mental illness through the emerging field of disability studies

An Active Mind's picture

"Stomp Out Stigma" with Active Minds!

Last night Active Minds held an unveiling of their “Stomp Out Stigma” video followed by a panel discussion, which included Anne, Michael Tratner (a professor of English and Film), and Elna Yadin and Alexis Rosenfeld (two psychologists at the Child Study Institute). 

An Active Mind's picture

Autobiographies of Mental Illness

Before starting Kay Redfield Jamison’s An Unquiet Mind, I was interested in memoir’s relation to mental illness. I wondered, are memoirs like Jamison’s successful? Are they able to capture the true nature of the illnesses they discuss? Do they work to change perceptions concerning mental illness?  What are the benefits and detriments of these types of personal narratives?  

Seeing Stigma

  

 

Alexander McQueen
Spring/Summer 2001 Collection





“We do not know our own souls, let alone the souls of others.  Human beings do not go hand in hand the whole stretch of the way.  There is a virgin forest in each; a snowfield where even the print of birds’ feet is unknown.  Here we must go alone and like it better so.  Always to be accompanied, always to be understood would be intolerable.”

--Virginia Woolf, “On Being Ill”

 

One Student's picture

life and art on the same side of the mirror

I have felt very grudging toward usages of 'genre' which expand the word beyond a strictly literary term. Of course humans categorize all aspects of their existence, and there's no need to take terms from one categoried area and apply it to another. That increases the sloppiness of categorization, by using an unneeded metaphor. 

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