netlogo

Emergence 2009: Student NetLogo Models

Emergence

Biology 361 = Computer Science 361
Bryn Mawr College, Spring 2009

 

Pages include a link to download the model. To download/view a model click on model name, chose File > Save Page As, then save with the .nlogo file extension.

 

Langton's Ant variants

Evan R.: Rotator01

Evan R.: NoAnt

Pseudo Non-determinisim in NetLogo

Determinism and Non-determinism in NetLogo
NetLogo is designed to mimic a parallel processing system, although it is fundamentally a serial processing one. For example, when a set of agents are asked to run a command, the agents must be sequentially asked because they cannot be asked simultaneously. This feature of NetLogo can be used to illustrate deterministic processes as well as to mimic non-deterministic ones.

Emergence: Primal Patterns Applet (2)

Instructions

setup resets the model with a random arrangement of purple and yellow cells (determined by the setup-seed-number slider).

Deterministic and Non-deterministic Emergence: Non-deterministic Emergence

Non-deterministic Emergence

 

Inquiry approach 3
Non-deterministic emergence

Goal: to contribute to the ongoing creation and exploration of possibilities

Deterministic and Non-deterministic Emergence: From Primal Patterns to Emergence

 

Ways of Making Sense of the World:
From Primal Patterns to Emergence


Moving beyond primal patterns as a way to make sense of things
"In the beginning was the Word?"

Inquiry approach 1
Primal patterns

Goal: to characterize the underlying pattern that everything actually relates to

Emergence: Primal Patterns Applet (1)

Deterministic and Non-deterministic Emergence

Instructions

setup resets the model with a random arrangement of purple and yellow cells (determined by the setup-seed-number slider).

Deterministic and Non-deterministic Emergence

 
Ways of Making Sense of the World:
From Primal Patterns to Deterministic and Non-Deterministic Emergence

 

 

The world as we perceive it is neither fully disorganized (Figure 1), beyond our ability to identify any overall pattern in it, nor fully organized, describable by us in terms of some single simple pattern (Figure 2). Instead, we are faced with, and find ourselves trying to make sense of, a world that most typically shows mixes of pattern and disorganization at different scales (Figures 3, 4, 5).

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