feminism

Critical Feminist Studies 2012 - Web Paper # 4

Welcome to Critical Feminist Studies, a course offered at Bryn Mawr College in Spring 2012. Here you will find the final web events all of the the students pursued individually as they completed their course work.

Take a look around, and feel warmly welcome to respond in the comment area available at the end of each paper. What strikes, intrigues, puzzles you...what, among your reactions, might be of interest or use to the writer, or others in the class, or others who--exploring the internet--might be in search of a thoughtful conversation about the shape and sound of feminism today?

 

Critical Feminist Studies 2012 - Web Paper # 3

Welcome to Critical Feminist Studies, a course offered at Bryn Mawr College in Spring 2012. Three months into the semester, students are exploring questions that have arisen for them in the course of our discussions of Eugenides' novel Middlesex, Bornstein's Gender Workbook, Kristof and WuDunn's Half the Sky, Query and Funari's Live Nude Girls Unite!, hooks' Feminism is for Everybody, Bannon's The Undefeated, Kimmel's "Masculinity as Homophobia," and Ware's Jimmy Corrigan.

Take a look around, and feel warmly welcome to respond in the comment area available at the end of each paper. What strikes, intrigues, puzzles you...what, among your reactions, might be of interest or use to the writer, or others in the class, or others who--exploring the internet--might be in search of a thoughtful conversation about the shape and sound of feminism today?

 

Critical Feminist Studies 2012 - Web Papers #1

These are the first webpapers to emerge from Critical Feminist Studies, a course offered at Bryn Mawr College in Spring 2012. One month into the semester, students are writing here about ...

Take a look around, and feel warmly welcome to respond in the comment area available at the end of each paper. What strikes, intrigues, puzzles you...what, among your reactions, might be of interest or use to the writer, or others in the class, or others who--exploring the internet--might be in search of a thoughtful conversation about the shape and sound of feminism today?

 

jfwright's picture

The Stories We Tell Ourselves: A Continuation of Web Event #2

http://thestorieswetellourselves.tumblr.com/

This webpaper expands on the children's book I started for web event #2. While this book isn't finished - and isn't meant to be - I sincerely hope you enjoy the work I've put into it! I certainly have been.

jfwright's picture

Activism Begins at Home: A Plenary Resolution Regarding the Admission of Trans Female Applicants to Bryn Mawr College

A few weeks ago, I created a blog post that discussed Bryn Mawr’s policy of case-by-case acceptance of the applications of prospective trans female students for review. Since this post, I have been spurred by the ideas we have discussed regarding creating right relationships: it is not enough to grant rights, which requires one group to assume authority over another, but rather, all groups must be treated respectfully, and with dignity and equality. It is in the spirit of respect, dignity, and equality that I introduce a draft of a Plenary resolution that recommends the unconditional review of applications of prospective trans female students for review by the Office of Admissions.

chelseam's picture

Gender and Sexuality in the High School Biology Classroom: Fostering Critical Thinking and Active Engagement

    Gender and Sexuality in the High School Biology Classroom:

Fostering Critical Thinking and Active Engagement

 

Summary: This project was undertaken with the hope of changing the ways we think about teaching and engaging with science. This paper will discuss ways to help students recognize that science is interdisciplinary and can both affect and be affected by the social and/or political context it exists in.  

By asking students to think about the way science is presented and conducted, and giving them the tools to think about science not as an isolated body of information, but as a dynamic and shifting discipline, we will not only be encouraging more engaged science scholarship, but will also help students begin to notice the ways science is used as evidence in different contexts and evaluate these uses.

Objective:

The goals of this project are two-fold. I hope to suggest ways for biology teachers:

LittleItaly's picture

Is Gender still an Issue?

So I remember in the very beginning of this semester the topic of gender popped up in class. The question 'is gender discrimination still an issue' was brought up but we didn't have time to discuss about it in depth. So here is a link to the  video my friend showed me that I thought would be interesting for everyone to watch.

It's a trailer of one of the films that are in the 2011 Sundance Film Festival - 'Miss Representation'

http://vimeo.com/18985647

jfwright's picture

"Called Me Crazy": Insanity and Non-Normative, Butch Identities

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          As Eli Clare describes in Exile and Pride: Disability, Queerness and Liberation, queer identity has been treated as madness, and queer people have been pathogized and condescended to for centuries:

“[q]ueer identity has been pathologized and medicalized. Until 1973, homosexuality wasconsidered a psychiatric disorder. Today transsexuality and transgenderism, under the names of gender dysphoria and gender identity disorder, are classified as psychiatric conditions. Queerness is all too frequently intertwined with shame, silence, and isolation…[q]ueer people deal with gawking all the time: when we hold hands in public, defy gender boundaries and norms, insist on recognition for our relationships and families…Queer people have been told for centuries by church, state, and science that our bodies are abnormal” (Clare 2009:112-113).

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chelseam's picture

Claiming the Stare: Jes Sachse and the Transformative Potential of Seeing

                                 Claiming the Stare: Jes Sachse and the Transformative Potential of Seeing

                                       American Able - Holly Norris                     "Crooked" Tattoo

          

  We all love to look. While staring is most commonly thought of as an act to be avoided or ashamed of, Disability and Women’s Studies Scholar Rosemarie Garland-Thomson argues that the stare at its best actually has the potential to create new meanings and more open societies.  The stare as Thomson defines it, has the potential to help us redefine the language we use to describe each other and ourselves, create space for the often-excluded in communities, and craft our own identities. The stare is most dynamic and productive when the subject of the stare, the staree, is able to wield some control over the interaction and in doing so present their story to the starer.

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