education

alesnick's picture

Reimagining the Disrupted Classroom

Reimagining the Disrupted Classroom, by Katie McCormick, Bryn Mawr College, 2013

Introduction and Description of Context

This proposal was inspired by my work this semester at El Centro de la familia.  I spent Tuesday mornings working with a group of mothers whose children attend a preschool program at the center.  The mothers, all of whom are recent immigrants to the U.S., participate in informal English language classes while their children attend preschool in another part of the building.  The reason for this setup is three-fold.  First, it helps enrich the educational experience for the preschoolers because it gives parents the tools they need to support their children’s learning and academic success.  Second, it benefits parents by helping them develop their English proficiency, addresses parenting and  work-related skills, and focuses on computer literacy.  Third, it removes the legal barrier of running a preschool without certified teachers by keeping parents onsite during school hours. 

CFS's picture

CFS Faculty

Bryn Mawr Faculty

Ann Brown

Ann Brown (Education)
Program Coordinator and Student Adviser
Bettws-Y-Coed 305, Bryn Mawr College
abrown@brynmawr.edu
(610) 526-5376

Kim cassidy

Kim Cassidy, Ph.D. (Psychology)  

Provost, Bryn Mawr College

kcassidy@brynmawr.edu

(610) 526-7383

Interests: Desire understanding, theory of mind and aggression, name phonology

Jody Cohen

Jody Cohen, Ph.D. (Education)
Senior Lecturer in Education
Bettws-Y-Coed 303, Bryn Mawr College
jccohen@brynmawr.edu
(610) 526-5214

Srucara's picture

The Science, Ethics, and Politics of Water - a Curriculum

Hi everyone, please download the following files for my curriculum and my rationale.

Betsy Biernat's picture

Multicultural Education in Mathematics

My inquiry project looks at how one can incorporate a multicultural/diveristy/social justice perspective in math classrooms.

Cathy's picture

very weak post that I was wondering if I should even post

So this week, in terms of ed placement I've been trying to discover more of Asian culture in relation to America. In my placement I figure out that I knew nothing of the Asian American experience even thought I want to honor everyone's diversity in my classroom someday. I wouldn't have picked up on this if it hadn't been for my suburban placement having only white and asian kids. I was taught to look at majority and minority balances in terms of possible difference and then I thought "Oh no, I want to teach at a suburban school someday, but white culture is easy to adapt to, what do I do with the Asians?" This was really weird for me because I pride myself on being multiculturally sensitive becuase of my backgrounds, and what was even weirder is that my best friend since 3rd grade is Viet, but I still don't feel like I know how her race and culture relate to her experience. For some reason, that racial experience has always been invisible to me, despite my exposure to literature about the Hmong in the US and other groups. I decided to reconsile this dissonace by bugging my asian friends to help me learn more and I hope to take an Asian American history/culture class before I graduate. I can't believe I didn't notice one of the biggest groups in America in my quest to be inclusive. I'm really embarressed about this, but at least now I know and I can work towards making that better. 

laik012's picture

Journal Post 6

After having had read Lives of the Boundary Mike Rose and Noa’s Arkby David Schwarzer, I began entering the class feeling enthusiastic and of course full of ideas to experiment with my tutee. My goal from this visit was to further extend Mike Rose’s statement regarding human connection. I wanted to gain trust but equally gain respect from my tutee. I started the session by asking if he had any homework. He responded “yes” accompanied by an unwilling spirit. We started the homework with math problems regarding symbols such as < (less than), > (greater than) and = (equal). It occcured to me that it takes a lot of creativity to form something interesting that can gain my tutee’s interest.   In terms of English, we did a few words that required us to fill in the blanks. One of the vocabulary for today was the word “shade”. At first we tried to illustrate the word through drawing tall trees shading people below them. Later, I tried to illustrate this word through some acting techniques. I was trying my best to create a third space between us while reminding myself not to be oppressive but still gain respect. . It was certainly a tiring day but I learned so much more about my tutee and I was so proud of him when it came to reading time. Last session, my tutee was barely interested to get by two books. Today my tutee told me that he wanted to make his parents proud and he read me 5 books.

couldntthinkofanoriginalname's picture

The word, "DISCOURSE"

I have noticed that the word, "discourse" is in many posts! Great! It definitely became part of my vocabulary after taking this course in Fall 2012. From you all, I would love to know how you define "discourse." What is your definition? What does the word capture when you use it? What are its limitations?  How has using ut, or knowing it well (?), shaped your outlook in the class and/or beyond?

Would love to hear comments! Looking forward to reading more posts...

Best,

Esteniolla M.

jayah's picture

Paper Two

Jayah Feliciano

February 18, 2013

Paper 2

 

Theoretical Analysis Reflection

     In Lareau’s text, she focuses on low/working and middle class families and the impact that their way of living has on the offspring.  She states that middle class families engage in concerted cultivation as opposed to the low/working class families who prefer natural growth for their children. Lareau believes that the children raised in the middle classes families gain more of advantage than the children in low/working class families, and I agree with Lareau.

            Chapter three is about a boy, Garret Tallinger, who is raised in a middle class family. Organized sports are a top priority for him and they shape Garret to be competitive, aggressive, and teach him how to work with a team. In addition to sports, his parents use a technique of answering questions with more questions to arrive at an answer. They also teach Garret how to interact with adults, making sure he gives eye contact when shaking the hand of an adult. The parents of Alexander Williams, who is also middle class, makes sure that he questions authority.

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