Evolution and Literature Web Paper 3

kgrass's picture

Finding Meaning in the World Through Tap Dancing

                                          Katie Grassle

Web Paper 3

Finding Meaning in the World Through Tap Dancing

AnnaP's picture

The Evolution of Storytelling: Comics as a Revolutionary Narrative Form in Scott McCloud’s Understanding Comics

In Anne Dalke’s and Paul Grobstein’s course, “The Story of Evolution and the Evolution of Stories,” we have moved on to talk about the latter half of the course title and we are currently taking a critical look at potential new ways of storytelling such as graphic novels and films. Personally I have become extremely interested in comic books as a new and evolving narrative form, and I am interested in how graphic novels and comics are becoming increasingly recognized in academia. How can the unique form of comics continue to evolve to create space for newer and more exciting ways of storytelling?

ckosarek's picture

Dear Diary: Tell My Secrets to Everyone

 For my project, I've created a mini-blog exploring what publicizing our private lives online via blogs and status updates has done for our schemas about social intimacy and the mainstream. You can find the blog here

cr88's picture

Screw This: The Challenge of Representing Ambiguity in Filmic Adaptations of Henry James’ “The Turn of the Screw”

 The Story of Evolution and the Evolution of Stories

4/11/2011

Krishnan Raghavan

 

Screw This: The Challenge of Representing Ambiguity in Filmic Adaptations of Henry James’ “The Turn of the Screw”

 

elly's picture

"Can't we just watch the movie??"

Elly Leman

Webpaper #3

Due April 15th, 2011

 

“Can’t we just watch the movie??”

 

Hilary McGowan's picture

Defining Science and Literature

dshanin's picture

The Multitudes of Whitman

The search for objectivity has been at the core of scientific inquiry for many years.  Throughout this course it has been argued however, that an inescapable subjectivity exists within any scientific inquiry.  This “spark” of creative innovation is what divides great research from the mundane.  Though scientific technique is notable for its rigid and formulaic nature the actual questions addressed by research reflect the personal experiences and character of the researcher.  Those who possess particularly innovative or novel lines of inquiry are rewarded with grants and awards while those that fail to remain unfunded, never reaching fruition.  The subjectivity being described here is remarkable for just how carefully the scientific community attempts to control
LS2's picture

Whitman and Convergence

April 20, 2009

Story of Evolution/Evolution of Stories—Grobstein and Dalke

Paper #3