mental health

ekoike's picture

SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) As A Result of the Lack of Sunlight?

Seasonal Affective Disorder As a Result of the Lack of Sunlight?

Paul Grobstein's picture

Brain Research: Improving Global Harmony

Introductory Remarks
Paul Grobstein
16 November 2007
Paul Grobstein's picture

The Brain and Social Well-Being

The Brain as a Learner/Inquirer/Creator:
Some Implications of its Organization for Individual and Social Well Being

 

Paul Grobstein
ctreed's picture

Lethe In A Pill

Throughout history and across cultures, the force of memory has always held a prominent position in our concept of humanity and self.  The ancient Greeks embodied memory in a goddess – Mnemosyne, the mother of the nine inspiring Muses.  But what if a person possessed memories so upsetting and intense that they caused him to not be able to function as himself?  If you had the option, would you choose to forget or to distance yourself?  This dilemma is now a source of debate among scientists and medical practitioners.  Propranolol, a drug previously prescribed to people suffering from hypertension, has also been found to bring some relief to victims of traumatic events by manipulating their memory of the experience.

Rachael Lubitz's picture

Making Excuses for the Way We Are

When I was young, I was that kid. I was the kid who everybody hated, and who hated everybody, and enjoyed it. My peers singled me out from as early on as I can remember. Having very few friends, I developed a hobby, bolstered by an overactive imagination, of sensationalism and overreaction; some time around the fourth grade I decided I was an alien from outer space.

The story was elaborate: my alien parents had switched me with the real Rachael, and used the human child's DNA to make me an exact copy of her. My real self, the alien, had blue skin and eyes on long stalks, and seven fingers on each hand.

Paul Grobstein's picture

Risk and Innovation

Living a Life of Risk, and Why:
Encouraging Innovation in Individuals and Communities

Paul Grobstein
24 October 2007

From prior discussions

ctreed's picture

Mnemosyne vs. Lethe

Throughout history and across cultures, the force of memory has always held a prominent position in our concept of humanity and self.  The ancient Greeks embodied memory in a goddess – Mnemosyne, the mother of the nine inspiring Muses.  But what if a person possessed memories so upsetting and intense that they caused him to not be able to function as himself?  If you had the option, would you choose to forget or to distance yourself?  This dilemma is now a source of debate among scientists and medical practitioners.  Propranolol, a drug previously prescribed to people suffering from hypertension, has also

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