Topics of the Day

 


 

Initial Thoughts and Questions: Please discuss the following questions with one other person and be prepared to share with the larger group.

 

  1. Are you familar with today's topic? Where and in what context have you heard about this topic?
  2. What is your understanding of this topic?
  3. How, if at all, do you think it relates to Inquiry Instruction? How would it effect lessons and instruction?
  4. Any other thoughts on this topic?

 

Follow up Questions after the lesson:

  1. What is still unclear about this topic?
  2. What new questions do you have about this topic?

 

 

Topics of the Day:

 

 

 

 

Comments

GShoshana's picture

Metacognition

To give variety of opportunities to the students to understand what is taught in the class.  To help the student with the steps of learning and understaning/comprehension in order to achieve slef/independant learning.  To increase the feeling of the student that they are learning, which will increase their motivation to learn.

How can I increase the movitivation of a student who is not organized and responsible?  How can I assist them in being more responsible when transitioning between classes?

Alison did a good job and I enjoyed it.  I think the lesson would be more for the parents of my students, on back to school night, than for my students particularly.  As a teacher I can be more aware of my student's needs and adjust my style as needed for every student.

 

Verolga Nix-Allen's picture

Six Questions and Alison Cook-Sather's presentation

I am not familiar with nor have I ever heard of this topic.

I understand Metacognition as learning strategies  and awarenss of how students learn and even how we teach. 

Inquiry is related by open-ended discussions, planning a goal and opening different boxes to implement it reminding each person how we sing and/or even present differently..

I do plan to open my and my choir's understanding of the music by brain storming about the composer's intent, music in general, opening up other boxes for discussion.  I will also try other ways of performance with soloists and the choir to achieve blend, singleness of spiritual thought, assessing their individual strengths and weaknesses as soloists and choir members.  I will also try to be more transparent as I develop the process to present a song. Why? Why not? I may even begin to coach more than one person to sing the same solo hoping to demonstrate the diversity, develop comparable analysis and bringing their own emotions and experiences to the song.

Other questions may develop as I open these boxes but the process is clear right now.

I thought Alison was clear, resourceful, and informative and her activity was thought provoking.

 

 

Verolga Nix-Allen's picture

Six Questions and Alison Cook-Sather's presentation

I am not familiar with nor have I ever heard of this topic.

I understand Metacognition as learning strategies  and awarenss of how students learn and even how we teach. 

Inquiry is related by open-ended discussions, planning a goal and opening different boxes to implement it reminding each person how we sing and/or even present differently..

I do plan to open my and my choir's understanding of the music by brain storming about the composer's intent, music in general, opening up other boxes for discussion.  I will also try other ways of performance with soloists and the choir to achieve blend, singleness of spiritual thought, assessing their individual strengths and weaknesses as soloists and choir members.  I will also try to be more transparent as I develop the process to present a song. Why? Why not? I may even begin to coach more than one person to sing the same solo hoping to demonstrate the diversity and develop comparable analysis.

Other questions may develop as I open these boxes but the process is clear right now.

I thought Alison was clear, resourceful, and informative and her activity was thought provoking.

 

 

Deborah Hazen's picture

Other topics to consider

Teaching science "intersected with other parts of the curriculum"

Inquiry as a framework rather than a series of activities.

Asking questions, dialoguing with students about the difference between data, observations and conclusions.

 

 

joycetheriot's picture

Assessment of Inquiry

Everday Assessment in the Science Classroom

Chapter 5: Assessment of Inquiry by Richard A. Duschi

 

The focus on scientific inquiry needs to be on attainment of evidence and how it is used to generate and justify explanations.

Synthesize the research:

1.       The incorporation and assessment of Scientific Inquiry  in educational contexts need to form 3 integrated domains:

  • The conceptual structures and cognitive processes used when reasoning scientifically.
  • The epistemic framework used when developing and evaluating scientific knowledge and
  • The social processes and forums that shape how knowledge is communicated, represented, argued and debated.

2.       The conditions for science inquiry learning and assessment improve through the establishment of:

  • Learning environments that promote student-centered learning
  • Instructional sequences that promote integrating science learning across each of the 3 domains listed above
  • Activities and tasks that make the students’ thinking visible in each of the 3 domains and
  • Teacher designated assessment practices that monitor learning and provide feedback on thinking and learning in each of the 3 domains

 

Jill Bean's picture

Other possible topics to examine

project based learning

intrinsic/extrinsic motivation

engaging and education parents

Gardner's Multiple Intelligences

differentiation

Moira Messick's picture

Creating Space

I look forward to reviewing the results of the study that evaluates the project based course vs. survey based course in terms of memory retention.  It will be helpful for me when presenting my project-based program at this year's open house.

Deborah Hazen's picture

Me too, would love to hear more about

I'd love to hear more about your project-based program.

Geneva Tolliferreo's picture

7/21 PM Observations re: Dr. Grobstein's presentation... Boxes?

Why are we stuck in the box of putting everyone and everything in a box.  I thought the push was on thinking outside-the-box.  Or, in fact, is this yet another box (in light of Dr. Grobstein sharing this morning there aren't any facts).

Diane Balanovich's picture

Inquiry

I found the analogy about being a sea useful because it was an obvious way to bring to light how inquiry must have some direction and support. Since students are unfamiliar with this style of learning, we as teachers need to make sure we demonstrate how to go about thinking in this manner.

Deborah Hazen's picture

"Science is often thought of

"Science is often thought of as a specialized set of interests, abilities and practices, rather than as a general process of question-asking, intuition-testing and story-revising that all of us engage in daily, and which all of us--whatever our content area--can pursue in our classrooms. Understood in this way, science is accessible to everyone, and perhaps best taught intersected with other parts of the curriculum, by teachers who are themselves excited by the sort of teaching and learning that involves exploring new realms and trying out new tasks."

Diane, the institute description (quoted above) seems to say that all of us engage in the general process of question-asking, intuition-testing and story-revising (inquiry?). Do you agree? I wonder if students are familiar with this kind of learning/exploring the world but that they are unfamiiar with teachers asking for/assessing this kind of learning?

Judith Lucas-Odom's picture

50/50

Understanding inquiry.  Inquiring minds still want to know.  Does inquiry instruction lead to a target?  How do we develop an understanding of how to learn for our students?  If we believe that learning occurrs continously, then we could conclude that students can master their own learning in their own time.  When we allow the student to emerge in learning  and move away from just learning for a specific test, we take some of the pressures off of them to learn and make the observations that will help with their summaries which will lead to the AH Ha moment!

Geneva Tolliferreo's picture

7/21 AM Observations

We tend to stop searching when we find something we like / are comfortable with.

Deborah Hazen's picture

Inquiry based learning from Wikipedia

Are we comfortable with this explanation of inquiry based learning from Wikipedia?

Brie Stark's picture

Be sure to checkout science

Be sure to checkout science education resources on serendip here.

[http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/sci_edu/]

Example of contents: hands-on biology activities which include topics such as "Studying Our Senses" with jelly beans, "Dragon Genetics," and "Moldy Jell-O"; set of 18 chemistry activities for high school students, using consumer products for experiments and not requiring a lab and specialized equipment; teaching science across the curriculum, and bridging the two culture gap

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