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Women Living Well: Mind and Body Connection Forum

Women Living Well: Mind and Body Connection Forum


Comments are posted in the order in which they are received, with earlier postings appearing first below on this page. To see the latest postings, click on "Go to last comment" below.

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Sleep!
Name: Tasneem
Date: //2002-04-29 22:45:45 :
Link to this Comment: 1997

I know that BM is rated one of the hardest colleges in the country. I know that classes are hard because I take them. I know we are assigned a lot of work each day. But I do manage to get enough sleep. Do I do every single assignment given to me? Absolutely not. I'd say I do about 70% of the assignments. And I still do as well as I'd like and get a lot out of my time here. So I think that the real challenge is not learning to sacrifice on sleep but learning to prioritize. Learning to just let go and pay attention to our bodies over our deadlines every now and then. As we learned in the lecture you can't study/memorize well if you haven't gotten enough sleep anyway, so we're just wasting time if we don't re-learn how to sleep properly.


sleep
Name: Shanti Mik
Date: //2002-04-29 23:42:11 :
Link to this Comment: 1999

I've realized that I absolutely need my sleep. The less I have the harder I find it to function. It is very easy at Bryn Mawr to get hung up on a grade and to make it be more important than it really is. I try to remind myself that no grade is worth my sanity and that I need sleep. I usually try to work enough in advance that I don't have to choose between sleep and work but the times I do, sleep wins over. Mostly because I know if I don't get enough sleep, it won't matter if I had stayed up or not and at least then I'll be able to do what I need to for the future.


Sleep
Name: Nitya Thom
Date: //2002-05-03 14:23:03 :
Link to this Comment: 2048

Here at Bryn Mawr, I find that the first thing that students give up on in order to find time to study and get work done is sleep. I have found that this is more often couter-productive than useful, as when you are sleep-deprived you tend not to get much done anyway. Your performance is definitely much lower when you are sleep-deprived, as we saw in the last lecture.


Sleep
Name: Lelani
Date: //2002-04-28 22:05:11 :
Link to this Comment: 1982

I never ever ever seem to be getting enough sleep. Even when I get the perscribed 8 hours, I still wake up feeling sleepy. And I am big on naps. It nearly broke my heart when Dr. Pien told us we shouldn't be doing the two hour mid-day deal. But I do think that she was on to something when she said we shouldn't leave the tv on when we go to sleep. Generally I leave it on the timer with the volume really low because I like the white noise and it serves as a big night light. But usually I end up sitting in bed watching the late night talk shows...I can't help it. I love my Conan and my Leno and my Letterman and my PI and I'm even growing fond of Carson Daly...And when those are over, I'm totally mesmerised by the infomercials...Personally, I think that I don't get enough sleep at school because I'm not a day person. At home, I am awake all throughout the night and I sleep the morning thru afternoon away.


Sleep Deprivation
Name: Sherolyn O
Date: //2002-04-29 01:48:05 :
Link to this Comment: 1984

The Women Living Well seminar has helped me to see the strong relationship between health (including lifestyle habits, exercises and choices) and the ability to function effectively. As a student, I often place my studies as my first priority and push back exercise, sleep, and healthy eating when I have too much work to do. This seminar has helped me understand the importance of a healthy lifestyle and reminded me to take better care of my body.


Sleep Deprived
Name: Celestina
Date: //2002-04-29 03:26:18 :
Link to this Comment: 1985

Well...how do I make sure that I get enough sleep? Well in my earlier college experience, before that of my senior year, I never slept if I had work that had to get done. If it was a reading assignment I did what I could and wouldn't lose sleep over this. But there were many nights that I was up late working on a paper or doing other work for campus related activities. My body actually used to be able to take it. I would then go home during breaks and sleep the days away. But now I find it really difficult to stay up all night. I remember my junior year spring semester when I had five papers in the same week, four of them due on the friday before final exams began. I worked the entire week with literally NO SLEEP (except for the occassional 15 minute power nap that was timed by friends doing the same exact thing). I dont know what happened between then and now but now I can't stay up that long. My body really does scream for sleep so much now where I find it really difficult to stay up. Now I listen to my body. I sleep when I have to sleep and to be truthful, my grades look worse than when I used to fight not to sleep. This just shows that the seminar on sleep deprivation, while true and insightful, cannot work for college students. I sleep now when I have to but my grades aren't nearly as good as they used to be.


Sleep
Name: Lois
Date: //2002-04-29 12:27:53 :
Link to this Comment: 1988

One of the many things I am learning here at Bryn Mawr that is not on the syllabus of my classes is that's it okay to not always be the best at everything, it's okay to not give 110% all the time. Which means me and my health come first. And if I don't do as well on an exam or paper because I went to bed at my usual hour, well, so be it.
I am the most important thing in this school classroom equation - and I am in school for me, not to prove something to others. Which means I want to feel good. Which means I need to get enough sleep.
Plus I know I do better work when I'm rested.
Now if I can just manage to organize my awake time a little better.


sleep
Name: Ana
Date: //2002-04-28 10:16:56 :
Link to this Comment: 1976

Sleep has always been a proiority for me because I know that with the kind of schedule I keep (early classes, etc.), I need to be rested. Basically, I do my homework during my free time in the day and then finish up at night. I hang out with my friends and have some "me time," and then I go to bed.


Sleep
Name: Monica Loc
Date: //2002-04-28 14:24:36 :
Link to this Comment: 1977

I love to sleep! When I am well rested I can function very well! Lack of sleep also influences my mood for the day. When I do not get enough time to sleep, I sometimes feel more awake in the morning and then as the afternoon settles in I become so tired. I always try to have suffient time for sleeping but at the same time I have to also take the amount of work that I have into consideration. For exam week, I am going to try studying ahead of time so that I get enough sleep to do well on my exams.


Depression
Name: Sara Press
Date: //2002-04-28 18:04:36 :
Link to this Comment: 1979

I forgot to post a comment about depression, so here it is:

The range of moods a person goes through has a large effect on their performance. It is hard to work when you are really depressed, or really excited, any extreme mood makes a person less productive (in general). Also, if you are in a horrible mood, it is harder to play and enjoy your life.

When I need to change my mood I can do a few things, sometimes I like to just enjoy moping around the house for a while, but bubble baths, coffee, and an evening out with friends always seems to cheer me up.
I used to enjoy playing the piano to calm down or just reflect, but here it is not really an option. Also, if stressed and irritated often times a group of us go to the gym and see how long we can work out, although this is rare.


Sleep
Name: Sara Press
Date: //2002-04-28 18:10:35 :
Link to this Comment: 1980

I must agree that getting enough sleep is the best way to do well during day to day life. But it is rather hard to get to sleep at a decent hour when you know you have work piling up or your friends are all going to the club. We all try to get enough sleep, especially during finals, but often times with a busy lifestyle, we end up with less sleep than we would like. Often times we just drink lots of coffee to make up for the sleep we lost. But given a choice, i would choose sleep over a cup of coffee any day. I found that once i moved out of the dorm I have gotten a lot more sleep. The distractions and chaos of the dorms I lived in always had me up late and then dragging to class or sleeping through my alarm the next day.


Sleep
Name: Rabia
Date: //2002-04-28 21:45:09 :
Link to this Comment: 1981

Undoubtedly sleep is very important and a key to maintaining a healthy mind and body. However, I disagree that we need 8 or so hours of sleep a night. I usually average 4 hours a night with a light, half hour nap after noontime. I also find that sleep cannot be "made up" on the weekends, so I don't engage in this practice. And, in fact, I do believe that I am healthy and productive since the rest of my habits, such as drinking water, exercise, etc. complement my sleep schedule. For me, the balance between sleep and productivity is mitigated by attention to keeping a schedule and sticking by it. I believe that what has helped me during my time at Bryn Mawr and hopefully after I leave here is that I prioritize my activities.


Sleep
Name: Jennifer V
Date: //2002-04-27 23:52:04 :
Link to this Comment: 1975

I am one of those people who, as Dr. Pien described so aptly, "gets a little loopy" if I don't get enough sleep. Anything less than about eight hours a night and I'm useless the next day, so my self-imposed bedtime is practically an absolute. The only reason I would consider giving up some of those hours is to finish something that was due the next day, and I'm usually organized enough not to find myself in that position. During exams, my rules are stricter: sufficient sleep has priority over everything else. I never stay up late to study, because I know it would do more harm than good.



Name: Jennifer P
Date: //2002-04-26 21:45:53 :
Link to this Comment: 1972

In reference to the question of addictions, I think that it is a feeling which is specific to the individual. Only that person can know when they are crossing the line. I think that it is dangerous to generalize a concept like addiction. However I can not ignore the fact that often people realize too late. It seems like a double-edged sword. You just have to have faith in someone's knowledge and adaptation of right and wrong.


Wanting Sleep
Name: Elizabeth
Date: //2002-04-25 18:10:22 :
Link to this Comment: 1967

One of the wisest pieces of advice I received last semester around finals was from a fellow Mawrtyr. She said that no matter how much work you feel you need to do, getting sleep is more important. This has helped me greatly. I know I don't function without eight hours of sleep. Therefore, it's counterproductive to stay up late working since there's not way I'll function at all the next day. I don't always get the eight hours, but i think it's really about keeping tings in perspective. How helpful will it be to finish reading for a class if you're going to be falling asleep in it? Granted, there are times when it is more necessary to stay up late, but moderation is definitely key. Bryn Mawr is intense and demands a lot from students, but is it really worth being exhausted and exhibiting signs of someone who would be considered legally drunk?


sleep
Name: Kristina D
Date: //2002-04-25 20:31:55 :
Link to this Comment: 1968

i would like to thank the inventor of Diet Coke, Starbucks, and other "unhealthy" stimulants. that is the secret to life - caffeine. I don't think that with all of our requirments we can sleep at all.


Sleep
Name: Nicole Pie
Date: //2002-04-25 23:34:58 :
Link to this Comment: 1970

Here at Bryn Mawr it is very difficult to maintain a healthy sleep level, however I have found that when I get enough sleep I become more productive, however I work better at night so I find myself sleeping later in the mornings and staying up later during the nights. I think there isn't anything special one can do during exams except to set up a schedule and stick to it, which insures you get enough sleep during such a stressful time.


Sleep Deprivation
Name: Marie Brow
Date: //2002-04-25 16:55:42 :
Link to this Comment: 1964

I was a little upset after this week's talk because even though I get 7-8 hours of sleep a night I take hour naps almost every other day, which, according to Dr Pien means I'm sleep deprived. I think that I sleep better than most of my friends so I couldn't imagine that I could be classified as sleep deprived. Thinking back on it now I realize that Dr Pien didn't touch upon lethargy. Maybe its just a myth, but I believe that, though 75% of the time I'm taking naps because I am exhausted, other times I take naps simply because I am inactive. I think this is where exercise becomes very important. I can't give any scientific reason for it but I know that I often feel more tired on the days that I am realtively inactive than on the days when I am out and about. I believe I could probably improve my sleep quality and break out of my napping cycle if I was to become more active. We also didn't talk about sleep as an escape mechanism. The high stress level of Bryn Mawr often motivates us to seek escape. Sleep is one of the easiest ways that we can find that escape for a few hours. In that sense, sleep can be more than a bodily function when it becomes a tangible substance that we can use (and abuse).


Sleep Deprivation
Name: Liz Bonovi
Date: //2002-04-25 17:01:28 :
Link to this Comment: 1965

I find myself frequently cutting down my sleep time in order to get more work done. Then, during the day, I might take a nap to catch up a little.
This lecture made me think about the importance of saving time to sleep especially because sleeping more seems to contribute to academic success. A wonderful solution would be to lengthen our day so that everyone can get more than nine hours of sleep per night. Obviously, this is not possible, so the next best thing to do seems to be set priorities, making sure to put sleep at or near the top of the list. When people realize the amount of time they are spending doing things besides academics and sleeps perhaps they can see that there are many things that could be cut out of their daily schedule that are less important than sleep. During finals, I tend to cut down on socializing a little but I always get enough sleep because my body is able to setting into a natural rhythm of going to bed at around 1:30 or 2:30 and waking up at around 10:30 or 11:30. During finals this semester I will be sure to get enough sleep because my schedule will be more flexible.


sleep ... or lack thereof
Name: Irum Shehr
Date: //2002-04-25 12:08:38 :
Link to this Comment: 1959

Sleep - that very elusive thing! The past few weeks and the coming few have/will be very stressful for me. I have not been sleeping nearly enough and its beginning to affect my health, and I can almost feel my immune system getting weaker. Its extremely difficult, at this time of year and stage of my academic career to get enough sleep and to make sensible decisions about when to stop going and just go to bed. I usesd to be of the just push myself til I collapse variety, but now not only can I not do that, I have realised that it makes me a miserable, unhealthy person to do so. Not that I am anywhere close to getting enough sleep now, but I have learnt to prioritise sleep in a way that makes me a more productive person. If you are pushing your body to the limit, you need to give it some rest so that it can keep up the pace.


sLeEp
Name: Hedya
Date: //2002-04-25 12:54:52 :
Link to this Comment: 1960

I've never like to procrastinate because my worst fear is not being able to go to sleep because I'll have to complete an assignment due the next day. Does this happen now and then anyway? Sure. There are days when I have so many things lined up (classes, meetings, tasks, etc.) that I know I have to keep myself busy in between them. I can't lie down in my room to kill that half hour of time in between scheduled tasks for myself because i WILL fall asleep.

To improve this situation, the best solution would obviously be setting a definite sleep pattern for myself at night. But with the upcoming finals week, I don't know if that's going to happen so soon. I should, however, learn to utilize the magic of naps. I'm one of those people who usually takes 1 1/2 hour naps, which the Dr. said wasn't a good idea. I'm going to start limiting them to 20-30 minutes and see how I feel.


Sleep
Name: Nana Ama
Date: //2002-04-25 13:45:37 :
Link to this Comment: 1961

Sleep is very important to me even though i never get enough of it on weekdays. I however make up for it on weekends but I've learnt that its not even enough to make up for lost sleep. I see the direct relation between sleep and performance ie.. whenver i dont get enough sleep, going to class is just a waste of time.
Its an "abusive" cycle. I stay up all night to do my work, perhaps go to class the next day and end up understanding nothing in class or miss class ... then i stay up all night again coping notes and struggling with my assignments because i either missed class or understood nothing class. Well Bryn Mawr is a tough place but it dont think my schedule is such that I would not be able to get hrs of sleep each night. I just need to be more organised then I would get enough sleep.


sleep
Name: shanze
Date: //2002-04-25 11:40:56 :
Link to this Comment: 1958

For me sleep is very important. If I don't get enough sleep, i can't concentrate in my classes, I become very grumpy and get mad easily, and feel miserable for the rest of the day. Here at Bryn Mawr, I make sure I get atleast 8 hours of sleep every night. In order to get that sleep I manage my time well so that I can finish my work and do anything else I need to and still go to bed on time. Some days I have more work than others and so I don't get enough sleep but I make sure to try and sleep early the following night.


Forum Question Sleep Deprivation
Name: Amy Campbe
Date: //2002-04-24 18:49:34 :
Link to this Comment: 1952

Dr. Pien illustrated some of the effects on performance resulting from loss of sleep. Most notably was the comparison to alcohol consumption and the BAL and also the obvious physical effects of lack of sleep that remain constant over a period of days even though the ability to perform at a high level continues to drop. Thereby creating an illusion that one's ability to perform is no more impaired with two days loss of sleep as it is with four.

Given the schedules and the kinds of lives led at Bryn Mawr, how do you manage to get enough sleep in order to be productive and able to think clearly? How do you decide to choose bewteen giving up sleep hours to get more done? Is the outcome always successful? Are their insights you gained that will be helpful during the upcoming exam period?


question for final paper
Name: Amy Campbe
Date: //2002-04-24 18:52:57 :
Link to this Comment: 1953

NOTE: DO NOT POST PAPER ON FORUM BOARD, POST PAPER ON THE WEB PAPER POSTING LINK.

Question:
Mind and body are often thought of a separate and distinct aspects of humanexperience. In ways does talking about them as inter-related, as we have for this series, help your thinking about lifestyle habits, practices, and choices? In general? Here at Bryn Mawr?

The paper must be a minimum of one page in length (12 pt single spaced).
Please post on the web paper link and deliver a hardcopy to the athletic office. Due Date: May 3


sleep deprivation
Name: Diana La F
Date: //2002-04-24 19:41:00 :
Link to this Comment: 1954

Sleep? What is sleep? In the beginning of the semester I'm lucky if I get six hours of sleep. At this point in the semester, I get maybe three a night, I'm not too sure...I kinda lose count. And it's only going to get worse. If sleep deprivation can be likened to having a hi BAC, I should be dead from alcohol poisoning right now, but this isn't any different than any of my fellow Mawrtyrs. I'll live, I always do. And my parents are used to the fact that when I come home from college for vacation I sleep for like sixteen hours a day for the first week I'm home. It's just become normal really. Mmm...sleepy...papers...arg...



Name: aeronwy
Date: //2002-04-24 21:05:32 :
Link to this Comment: 1955

given the schedule and kind of life i lead at bryn mawr, i frankly don't get enough sleep to be as productive and clear-headed as i could be. however, i am resigned to this as being the truth because i know that it is in my personality to procrastinate. i do this purposefully because i hate school and i won't work until i feel the pressure. i know you might say, "well, just start earlier". but i mean it. i really CANNOT work unless i feel the heat. i have sat down and attempted to be productive in advance of deadlines, but there's never a thought in my head. since i've managed to make it to bryn mawr, and i've done all right for myself here, i feel like this method is really successful for me, and if sleep deprivation is the price i pay for it, so be it. i like my life and in some ways i'm almost proud of being sleep-deprived. it's practically normative for a college student, so that i'd almost feel guilty (perversely so, i grant you) if i never felt tired - almost as if i actually WEREN'T being productive enough! knowing the character of women at bryn mawr and the lives they lead, if they felt like they had spare energy they'd probably go out and volunteer somewhere. which is great, but my point is that we naturally will always strive to push ourselves to our physical and psychological limits. if we don't feel burned out or we don't think we're impaired, we'll take on more.

as for how i make the call between sleep and work, it's very simple - how critical is the work? if it absolutely has to be done by the next day, then i need to do what it takes to get it done. i've crammed for every test i've ever taken, and i've gotten kick-ass scores. no, i didn't actually learn the material (consolidate learning for the long term), i admit, but then again i really have no interest in spanish or calculus anyway. hey, i'm smart. i like learning. that's very different from being a "good" student. but back to sleep... yes, i would say that the outcome is usually successful. i would call myself an academic success, sure. because of that, even though i did learn a lot of new information today, there's nothing i feel that i need to change about my behavior just because exams are coming up.


Motivation
Name: Alice Goff
Date: //2002-05-03 10:14:40 :
Link to this Comment: 2040

Sleep deprivation has become a way of life at Bryn Mawr. Whenever we are on vacation, the first thing I appreciate is how rested I feel. I also feel much more motivated to get things accomplished. If I could translate this feeling of motivation to when I'm actually in school, I would be set to go. I think having a requisite amount of sleep is definitely crucial to achieving this, and many of my goals and a student.


Sleep
Name: Mariah Sch
Date: //2002-05-03 11:25:45 :
Link to this Comment: 2043

I often do not get enough sleep at Bryn Mawr and frequently choose to get more work done and sleep less. I am pretty sure that I am less functional when I don't get enought sleep. I think slower and make more mistakes. After listening to the sleep deprivation lecture, I have made an effort to get more regular frequent sleep. My efforts haven't been successful recently because of the demands of finals period. In medical school I plan to develope a regular sleep schedule and to stick to it.


Addiction
Name: Kate
Date: //2002-04-24 13:27:38 :
Link to this Comment: 1947

I believe that the reason people have addictions in the first place is to escape from a part of their lives. Until those issues are addressed, the addiction can never truly be healed, because the wound will always be there. People who use drugs or alcohol or food or anything else to numb the pain they feel can move from substance to substance trying to find an answer, but it will not come until they look within. This all sounds a bit corny, but I think it's true.


Addiction
Name: Celestina
Date: //2002-04-24 11:08:57 :
Link to this Comment: 1944

Well I have to agree with other people in this forum that one has to be honest with themselves about addiction. About crossing the line, that does become blurry. First off, many people would say that I am an alcoholic. But I'm not. I don't sneak drinks, I never get too drunk, etc. But then I thought about the self-medicating aspect of alcohol and I realized that I do use it to self-medicate myself, to destress myself after a long day or week. But it hasn't gotten to the point where I need it badly. If it's around I'll take a drink, and if not then it's no big deal. In much the same way, my father has always drank beer after coming home from work. But he is in no way addicted. He has stopped for months at a time, just because he felt like he should, but he is and was never an addict of alcohol. He simply saw beer as a way to put him at ease after a long day at work. Would someone call that addiction? I don't think so, especially after my father was addicted to smoking...and it took him many years to finally stop smoking cold turkey. I think that someone might have to have an addictive personality in order to become an addict. Or maybe other conditions that are already present to become an addict, like very depressive, or with the mindset that they will become addicts. You know that old saying, Mind over Matter. The mind is a powerful tool. And believing you have an addictive personality could turn you into an addict.


Addiction
Name: emiko sait
Date: //2002-04-24 11:38:29 :
Link to this Comment: 1945

Addiction is a difficult thing. I think everyone has been exposed to loved one's and thier addictions at one point or another. But where does the line distinguish enjoyment and addiction? For me it is a difficult line to distinguish. We all experience loss of control in different forms. But when does that loss of control become detrimental? Sometimes letting og of the reins is helpful for perspecive. Therefore, I think that the line between addiction and control varies for everyone. There is no single formula to address all the questions of addiction for everyone. I think the best way to approach viewing addiction is to begin with taking an inventory of one's life and questioning how well one treats oneself. In the exercise lecture a few weeks ago, Kate mentioned that selfcare is an integral part of being physically and emotionally healthy, I think that a simple message like that is a good place to start.


Addiction
Name: Barbara Ca
Date: //2002-04-23 21:51:14 :
Link to this Comment: 1939

I agree with many of the comments here that addiction is not something easily defined or delineated. I think it is problematic, however, when people believe they can walk that blurry line on their own. Being addicted means, after all, that you are to some degree not in control of your own behaviour. So when someone claims they can drink often and in great quantities but are still 'in control' of their drinking I am skeptical. It is difficult to judge dependency when what you are craving has become your greatest priority. Rational thought just seems to fly out the window- I have seen it happen far too often. Drinking charts and the like, however, don't take into account individual differences. Since I certainly don't want to advocate total abstinence, it might be a good idea to ask friends or family to gage your dependency, really putting some weight on their opinions. When it comes to addiction, they are probably better judges than generalized statistics and, as difficult as it is to accept, than even you yourself.



Name: Elizabeth
Date: //2002-04-23 22:47:48 :
Link to this Comment: 1940

Many of the addictions that people experience are extremes of normal behavior and so for me the most important part is keeping the normal behavior in check. I think a lot of this is controlled by habits and perspective on life. Therefore, if you're healthy mentally, I feel that addictions are easier to avoid. This is not to say that they don't occur, but it's less likely to happen with a healthy lifestyle.



Name: Daniella F
Date: //2002-04-24 00:56:41 :
Link to this Comment: 1941

As others have mentioned, I believe there is an extremely fine line between addiction and controlled behavior. The fact that someone can cross that line without even realizing it is very scary. I have always found the concept of loss-of-control incredibly unsettling--I cannot even imagine how awful it would be to know something is damaging your life but at the same time have no power to stop it. It seems that an important part of avoiding addiction is probably monitoring yourself to make sure your wanting does not turn into needing. Again, though, a scary thought is that often times, people probably do not even notice the change until it has already happened. Since the line is so fine, it is hard to see any fool-proof method of prevention (except for abstinence, which, as mentioned, is unrealistic for many behaviors). But taking the risk does seem to work out fine for many. I guess the most important thing is being aware of your weaknesses before getting into anything and taking care to stay away from things you most-likely will have difficulty getting out of.


addiction
Name: Molly Finn
Date: //2002-04-23 20:01:38 :
Link to this Comment: 1935

After the session it's difficult for me to draw the line between addiction and non-addiction. I know it's personal and individual to everyone, but if a person has a glass of wine every evening is that an addiction? Is anyone else confused now, too?
Personally I like to stay as cognizant as possible at all times. A glass of wine makes me sleepy. I have many friends who know they have addictive personalities, and so they have always stayed away from alcohol, etc, and sometimes I wish they could have a drink, because I would like to be able to share a drink with them. But for the long run I think it has kept all of us smarter, more observant, healthier, and less likely to develop destabilizing addictive habits.


addiction
Name: Rachel Wri
Date: //2002-04-23 20:31:16 :
Link to this Comment: 1936

While I agree that addiction is something that cannot be measured in a purely standardized way, I think that there are some lines that are common for all. I think that control is at the heart of the question of addiction. You take something/participate in a behavior because it makes you feel good and you have control of your life/your emotions. When you can control your usage of a substance or a behavior (say take an aspirin or two to stop a headache) then I dont think you have an addiction, but when your life/behavior is defined in relation to that substance/particular behavior, then it controls you and addiction is present.

If I could have my wish, we would be more honest with one another about the stresses/concerns of our lives (including addiction) but I am not sure that even Bryn Mawr feels safe enough for people to be honest about such a touchy subject (or all of the other complicated problems that influence addiction like depression, abuse, self-image... many things that damage a woman's ability to live well.)



Name: Alice Goff
Date: //2002-04-23 20:41:39 :
Link to this Comment: 1937

Speaking of addiction in terms of drug use I would like to offer the following comments. I think that we are overlooking the possible motivation to engage in drug use. Especially in college, particularly drinking can be seen as a way of escape from the stress of our daily lives. I know many people who drink because they say it "takes the edge off". Is this condemable? I would argue that it is when the escape itself affects one's actual life, when the consequences are evident in one's normal behavior, that we can speak of "drawing the line". For some drugs the escape is automatically manifested in a person's life, for others there is such a thing as responsible and strictly extra-cirricular usage.


addiction
Name: natalie
Date: //2002-04-23 20:46:50 :
Link to this Comment: 1938

this week's topic was very interesting. it got me to thinking about what random things in life i have become addicted to. it seems easier then we think to become addicted to something, and after evaluating my lifestyle, i seem to have found several things which i don't think i can let go of. such as: 3 cans of mt. dew a day. i can't live without this or my cigarette or two a day. computer games also have become something i can't quite stop playing. mind numbing computer games seem to have taken over my life. it is causing failure in several of my classes. seriously though.....



Name: Jennings
Date: //2002-04-23 16:43:13 :
Link to this Comment: 1932

I'm addicted to cigarettes. I really enjoyed this week's talk about addiction. I thought the speaker was well informed and tried to not only look at if from the outside as so many people do, but also tried to take into account what the addicts are going through. This week was such an interesting topic, one that I hold very close to my heart.


Addiction
Name: Greta Tess
Date: //2002-04-23 18:54:54 :
Link to this Comment: 1933

Where to draw the line for addictions obviously differs from person to person. This does not mean however, that it is so ambiguous that we can not design prevention programs aimed at young women about the dangers of addictive behaviors and substances. Educating young women on the warning signs of people with addictive behaviors is important so they can recognize the signs in their friends. College is where a lot of these behaviors begin to take off, so this prevention would have to be before and during the college age years.


addiction
Name: Kristina E
Date: //2002-04-23 19:56:32 :
Link to this Comment: 1934

I think that it is interesting that addiction is usually framed around the male perspective or tolerance level. Many people at this school still do not realize how many drinks it will *actually* take to get them drunk. I think that there is a large misperception in young adults in high school and college about what constitutes a drinking problem. A study was just published that estimated that 44% of college students are binge drinkers, that is, regularily consume 4 drinks in an evening.


Addiction
Name: Tasneem
Date: //2002-04-23 13:31:44 :
Link to this Comment: 1930

I was really intrigued be a question someone raised about "drawing the line." I feel conflicted by two very different messages I'm receiving about college and early adult life. One message is that these are the best years of your life, these are the years you should experiment and sow your wild oats and all of that in the hopes of learning your limits so that you will be able to control yourself later in life, when it's more important to be more responsible. The message I got from the lecture is that addiction actually begins in these early years, and so by experimenting now I could be jeapordizing my future. So is drug/alcohol "celibacy" the only safe way to go? I wish I could hear the perspective of someone who had experimenting (moderately) in college but is now living a normal, healthy life.


Addiction
Name: Jennifer V
Date: //2002-04-23 14:35:37 :
Link to this Comment: 1931

As many people have already stated, I don't think there's any way to answer these questions in a general sense. People are responsible for their own choices, so it is important for them to be aware of their limits, and to be honest about their motivations. In many cases, this will help people make better decisions about how to keep all of their activities in an appropriate state of balance. However, I should think there are people who do understand the consequences of their actions, but choose to become addicted anyway. Therefore it also seems important for people to understand that there are other solutions to their problems, besides a temporary escape. If we want to talk about addiction in a meaningful way, it should be done in the context of all the other factors influencing someone's life.



Name: Jennings
Date: //2002-05-02 17:13:41 :
Link to this Comment: 2032

Sleep deprivation is a fact of life for a college student and basically anyone with a job, a life, kids or unless you are retired, I think you are sleep deprived. I think that we all live with the fact that starbucks coffee has a lot of caffine and we need it to survive. I also think we function fine that way. If the college was so worried about us being sleep deprived maybe they shouldn't assign six hours of homework a night for each class. Maybe we should have so many extra requirements in addition to our academics? But until I retire I am pretty sure I will be sleep deprived.


addiction
Name: Sarah Kim
Date: //2002-04-23 11:38:59 :
Link to this Comment: 1928

I first learned the idea of the addictive personality in health class in the 9th grade. From that time, I started to become paranoid in wondering if I didn't have an addictive personality, and became afraid that once I started something (like drinking, smoking, etc) that I would become addicted and unable to control that part of my life. I realize now that there are many other factors, and that you can become strong enough to overcome those characteristics of addictive personalities. I have never had a problem with a serious addiction (if you dont count Snood...I am terribly addicted to Snood). I find it difficult to deal with people who do have addictions, even with things like cigarette smoking.


sleep deprivation
Name: Sarah G. K
Date: //2002-05-02 00:20:46 :
Link to this Comment: 2027

I feel like this came too late in the semester, after I had abused my body plenty for the year (heck, all four years). I knew that not getting enough sleep affected you, but some of the symptoms were things I didn't really associate with it. I've noticed some other things of my own, for example when I dont sleep, I get achy joints and bumpy skin. Im sure that it's hard for most of us here at BMC to sleep, and get everything done that we need to get done. The most striking thing the speaker said was when she defined sleep deprivation as 'not sleeping to get more done'.


Sleep
Name: Greta Tess
Date: //2002-05-01 18:40:42 :
Link to this Comment: 2022

Honestly, at Bryn Mawr it's all about time management. I've never been willing to compromise my health or performance by not sleeping. It's almost "cool" here to brag about how little sleep you got last night in order to do work, but according to Dr. Pein, you're only hurting yourself. Although I certainly don't sleep as much here as I did in high school or during the summer, I rarely get more less than 7 hours of sleep--and yes, ladies, I have just as much work/extra cirriculars/social activities as you do. I know my limit on sleep and I try not to push that limit. Time management will allow you to spend more time in bed and probably perform at a higher level.


sleep deprivation
Name: emiko sait
Date: //2002-05-01 11:58:41 :
Link to this Comment: 2020

To be honest, I don't think anyone gets enough sleep at this institution. The demands that are placed on the students don't allow for a healthy lifestyle, let alone, adequate amounts of sleep. Often I find myself saying, "There aren't enough hours in the day..." I feel there really is no 'managing to get enough sleep' in order to be productive. It seems more the norm that sleep comes secondary to work that needs to be finished.
Although I know that the lack of sleep will impact my actual productivity and ability to do work well, I really can't take that into consideration. Usually, the choice made in my life is to compromise the luxury of sleep in order to get everything done. Granted, the outcome is not always what I want it to be, but there are deadlines to adhere to and other work waiting to get done. But the bottom line is that I feel sleep is a luxury rather than a necessity. There have been many occasions when I have fantasized about not needing to physically sleep. I would imagine how productive I would be and all the things I would be able to accomplish. Its almost disturbing.
Dr.Pien brought home the importance of sleep, I recognize that it is integral to remaining healthy. But like most types of self-care, I feel it is a luxury that my work cannot afford. Unfortunate as that is, unless the demands put upon students change, there will be no change in the prioritization of sleep in the grand academic scheme of things. I know for a fact that I will not be sleeping much in the next two weeks. In fact, I have slept very little in the last two weeks. In a way, it just seems normal to me, after four years here.


Addiction
Name: Rabia
Date: //2002-04-22 22:43:28 :
Link to this Comment: 1918

To me, life is a series of meditative moderative behaviors and actions. If we keep things--even seemingly benign things--in moderation we will be better equipped to meet the challenges that we and our minds and bodies encounter daily. Thus, in order to discern between extreme and moderate behavior, one needs to see to what extent a particular activity or behavior must be completed in order for a person to feel "whole" or "complete". If one needs a pack of cigarettes just to function, there is an obvious problem there and the body is thrown out of balance as substances replace the real nourishment that a body desires daily--namely exercise, sleep, food, water, and other healthy, beneficial activities.


addiction
Name: shanze
Date: //2002-04-22 20:32:15 :
Link to this Comment: 1914

Too much of anything is not good. Thus, a person needs to figure out when to draw the line. Realizing when to draw the line is a difficult task but in order to change that behavior one needs to know when they are doing too much of something. Once you know that and are truthful to yourself, you can seek help or fix your problems/addictions. In order to lead a healthy life one needs to have limits for themselves so that they do not end up being addicted to something.



Name: ashley
Date: //2002-04-22 17:05:58 :
Link to this Comment: 1909

Hmm. "...identifying when the line has been crossed..." This is a hard question. Obviously, I don't know the answer. Actually, I think that it is interesting that I am being asked to answer it, when, personally, I could really use someone to give me the answer. On a side note, it seems to me that Bryn Mawr fosters a lot of these extremes, and this reminds me of the lecture on depression, when we discussed the idea that it may not be the person themselves, but their environment. I think that when one is engaging in these activities they are not thinking how it will affect their well-being in the sense of health, but maybe in the sense of fulfillment or pleasure. It is hard when perhaps one of these extremes is the only thing a person feels gives them this fulfillment. I think that is a very easy trap to fall into and extremely difficult to emerge from. With that in mind, I guess we could say that we should look at the activities we are engaging in before we feel the need to involve ourselves in them to the point of excess. Of course, that could take up a lot of unnecessary time, and I have a lot of homework to do...


sleep
Name: molly finn
Date: //2002-05-01 11:14:43 :
Link to this Comment: 2019

I think it's difficult to know how much sleep you need. Last weekend I really cranked out and did so much work, but still got a good deal of sleep. But I was still exhausted. I needed to take a mental vacation. I can't decide whether it is an important experience to have so much work in college you think you are going to drop dead (because you build stamina) or if the system is entirely looney. But with guilt, I have to admit that I try to never compromise my seven or eight hours of sleep every night, even if it means not finishing work.



Name: Sara Press
Date: //2002-04-22 16:28:07 :
Link to this Comment: 1908

Honesty and confidentiality are two important factors in beginning open conversations about addiction. In close communities gossip is easily started, and this causes many people who have problems to stop communicating with friends and not tell people when they are having problems. The ability of a community to discuss in an understanding way, the impact and reasons for addictions, is a great start. But this is all easier said than done.
Yet, deciding where the lines should be drawn for healthy fun and normal experimentation verses addiction is complicated. Many women try different drugs or even drink quite a bit of coffee, so when does it become a problem? The tests for addiction can be found in many places, and often times are good indications, but for a younger group of women such as Bryn Mawr students, sometimes the tests are not so clear. One good sign is if addiction runs in your family, this tends to put you at higher risk, but there are many signs and it is not as easy as we would like it all to be. Hence, why we need open, honest, confident, and understanding conversations.



Name: ashley
Date: //2002-05-01 10:57:06 :
Link to this Comment: 2018

I try to get enough sleep, and usually I do. I do all-nighters when necessary, but it's not exactly fun to be up at 4 am pouring over those 20 chapters in your geology book you never read for that test in 6 hours. Lately, instead of choosing between giving up sleep hours to get more done, (these are the last few weeks!) i ask myself this question: should i go to sleep now and get up an hour earlier in the morning, or should i go to sleep an hour from now and get up an hour later in the morning? sometimes this method works, and sometimes i just end up going to bed right after i consider my options And get up a Couple of hours later in the morning. As far as exam period, i think my method will be do everything as quickly as possible, pray for a miracle that it turns out good, and then sleep for about the whole summer.


Addiction
Name: Mariah Sch
Date: //2002-04-22 12:04:51 :
Link to this Comment: 1904

I feel that the key to talking about and understanding addiction is to classify certain excessive activities according to the negative impact on the person, person's loved ones and on the community. It is important to prioritize when dealing with addictive behaviors. Behaviors like excessive drinking or excessive sexual activity need to be focused on first and the most because they are likely to have quicker and more serious harmful effects. Dealing with these behaviors immediatly can mean the difference between life and death. Although this is paramount, I also feel that maintaining a general sense of balance in all aspects of life is important. It is important because activities like excessive eating or laziness might not cause immediate or obvious harm but can and often will degrade a person's body and standard of living over time.


Addiction
Name: Meghan
Date: //2002-04-22 12:24:29 :
Link to this Comment: 1905

In accord with many of the other comments, addiction does seem to be an individual problem, with the exception, I think, of a genetic addiction. It is a difficult issue to combat in general, and I confess that I do have somewhat of a problem with it (coffee, for example - biting my nails, for another). Each addiction, and each individual, has its own baggage and complexities. It is difficult to watch certain substances ruin lives, certainly, but there is obviously no pat answer to everyone's difficulties.

Moderation has to be the key. And if moderation leads to excess somehow, then abstinence ought to be the key. At least as one who really does have "an addictive personality," I have found this to be true. I recently cut all sugar from my diet because I was craving ice cream all the time. When one begins to crave something, no matter what - a hamburger, or a cigarette, a beer - the key is not giving into it, and only then can one (possibly) begin to break the cycle.

I think that our society should be more open about addictive habits like smoking and drinking, or about substances like marijuana. Perhaps these aren't equivalent, but it seems imbalanced to advertise "substances" like fast food products NON-STOP on TV, and to ban commercials for, say, hard alcohol. We live in an excessive society, and it is difficult, and would be essentially impossible, to change that in any way. There is too much money to be earned in the addiction sector of this society for there to be honest discussions about curtailing excess. (Please forgive my pessimism.)

A great (and intense) movie on addiction that I recommend to everyone is "The Lost Weekend." I actually forget the star's name - Ray Millard, maybe? - but it's an old movie, from the 40s, about alcoholism and the persistent self-destruction of addiction.


Addiction
Name: Nicole Pie
Date: //2002-04-22 14:27:57 :
Link to this Comment: 1906

I think addiction should be looked at on a case by case basis, since everyone is different in their own way. By looking at addiction in this way, we can begin to understand why a preson becomes addicted to a certain vice, when another person won't. I think by generalizing addiction we devalue the severity of addiction. I think that there is no definate line we can draw when something becomes an adiction because of the differences between each person.


sleep
Name: Rachel Wri
Date: //2002-04-30 23:40:45 :
Link to this Comment: 2015

I don't get enough sleep. I am one of the people that the doctor described who is so chronically sleep deprived that I cannot even judge how it effects my performance. During my freshman year, I was extremely (dangerously) anemic and had no idea because I thought that the crushing exhaustion I felt was only a normal part of the college experience. All my other friends were tired too. NOw I know how dangerous the communal sleep deprevation is... it tricks us all into believing we can do more than we can, into ignoring the natural boundaries of our bodies and the limits of a single day. Now, though I am chronically sleep deprived, I never stay up all night-- no matter what. That is the boundary I set for myself but I need to learn how to make every night one of fuller sleep.


addiction
Name: Liz Bonovi
Date: //2002-04-21 19:15:22 :
Link to this Comment: 1899

By nature, addiction seems to be a very isolating behavior. The addicted person often alienates close friends and loved ones causing themselves to need the addiction even more. Perhaps with more education about addiction, and not just drugs and alcohol (people might not realized that a particular destructive behavior of theirs is actually an addiction), less people would begin such a destructive cycle. However, it seems that sometimes this is inevitable and thus we are faced with the problem of healing addicts. To me, healing addicts and preventing people from becoming addicted to something might be a similar process. I think that addiction generally fills a gap in a person's life. It is a way to displace negative feelings temporarily. So, the discussion of addiction should definitely include ways to identify that you have a problem that might lead you to addictive behavior and most importantly non-addictive behaviors/changes you can make in your life to make you less prone to such a devastating problem.


Depression
Name: Marie Brow
Date: //2002-04-21 14:38:30 :
Link to this Comment: 1896

Hey ladies,

Sorry to interrupt the flow, but I forgot to do my entry for depression last week and Amy said just to post it this week. I definitely believe in the power of depression to change our lives. I went through a long period of depression in which I didn't care what happened to me or my body. My own depression didn't bother me, but it frightened others who suggested I seek help. The idea that something was "wrong" with me, that I needed "help" was very upsetting. I am so grateful for the lecture on mood. Though I haven't been "depressed" in nearly two years, it was wonderful to hear that what I had gone through was "ok." In the first few posts we talked a lot about the cyclic quality of health and I truly believe that moods changes are a natural and beneficial part of life. It is when we stifle our feelings and try to correct them that we run in to problems.


Women and Addiction
Name: Monica Loc
Date: //2002-04-21 15:12:47 :
Link to this Comment: 1897

Living a healthy lifestyle is possible for everyone. To begin with, it is important for the individual to be honest with him/herself. It is only the individual that knows her body and her limitations with substances that can be of addiction and bad intervention in her life. Addiction is a strong word and I cannot find a way to best define it in terms of being short and simple. In the long run it can seem complex because it is associated with a negative connotation such as addiction to sex, drugs and alcohol. It is true that an individual carries out activities such as work, play, eat, sleep, etc. However individuals are presented with alcohol and other things that can lead to "addiction". It is up to the individual to make her decisions and hopefully it will be a wise one.


sleep
Name: natalie
Date: //2002-04-30 14:17:07 :
Link to this Comment: 2011

I have found that, though sleep is VERY important to me, often during finals weeks and crunch times, it is the first thing to go. Of course- if you have a paper and eight hours before it is due and you haven't slept in two days- what are you going to do? You're going to write the paper. Sleep is just lower on the priority scale compared to homework. I have developed unique sleeping patterns though for finals week and have learned ways to cope with little sleep. Of course this often includes resorting to large quantities of caffeine and remaining in a lit social area (yay for 24 hour computing services). After I get all my work done though, the first thing I do is catch up on sleep and try to get back to a regular schedule.


Sleep Deprivation
Name: Meghan
Date: //2002-04-30 12:15:28 :
Link to this Comment: 2010

I have to agree with Celestina in her earlier posting. At a certain point I think our bodies just burn out on lack of sleep. As a senior I get FAR more sleep than I used to. In fact, I have found it nearly impossible to wake up before I've slept 7 hours. (Scary!) As a Bryn Mawr student I confess to a lot of guilt about how much sleep I get. [[Especially when I overhear those college "competition" conversations: "You got 3 hours of sleep? I only got 1 1/2!" "Did I say 3 HOURS? I meant minutes! You're lucky I'm even alive!" etc.]]

While my grades have suffered much for my new and improved amounts of sleep, it is easier now for me to see all of this work in the light of the rest of my life. Learning is important, as is doing a good job on papers and being able to be proud of what we do. But I confess that the insights I gained about sleep deprivation have scared me into wanting MORE sleep, and just doing the best I can on my exams and papers. For example, the fact that lack of sleep can induce a pre-diabetic state in many people is terrifying! Research like this really shows that losing too much sleep over too long a period just isn't worth the strain.


sleep deprivation
Name: Daniella F
Date: //2002-04-30 00:58:24 :
Link to this Comment: 2005

I've always known how important it is to get enough sleep. When I'm going on too little sleep, I'm always exhausted by mid-day. Honestly, I think the only time I'm ever truly rested is when I get 10 hours of sleep. But I guess that's a little bit much for me to expect as a college student. What I didn't know, however, was just how much a lack of sleep can affect your performance in all different areas. I would love to say that this past lecture has inspired me (along with all of my friends in the class) to get my act together and make absolute certain that I get at least 8 hours of sleep every night--but I really feel that is unrealistic at this point, especially as we are approaching finals. I think that sleep deprivation is an unpleasant but inevitable part of college life. Then again, people in high stress jobs could say the same thing about their work environments...and then, when do you stop? When do you get to the point where you tell yourself that 8 hours of sleep a night is a true priority? I really don't know the answer to that question. Truthfully, all I am thinking about right now is how I'm going to get all my written work done for Friday. But I do think that this new knowledge I have obtained about sleep deprivation will motivate me to try and control my sleep habits more in general...Sorry if this posting is a somewhat incoherent. I'm actually going on three hours of sleep and my eyes are beginning to close. LOL. :)


First Forum Comment for Response
Name: Amy Campbe
Date: //2002-03-18 13:36:01 :
Link to this Comment: 1501

This on-line forum will be used to create a 'virtual conversation' about various topics/issues raised by our speakers. Please respond each week to the comment or question.

By Wednesday, March 20th

Introduce yourself and briefly describe how you define 'wellness', what does 'wellness' mean to you?


Introduction/Wellness
Name: Diana La F
Date: //2002-03-18 14:10:44 :
Link to this Comment: 1502

Hi. My name is Diana La Femina and I'm a frosh here at Bryn Mawr. What is wellness? That's a tough question. I guess the easiest answer is basic health on all levels: mind, body, and "spirit" (whatever that entails). That doesn't quite hit the nail on the head, however. I guess wellness is a floating term with no real definition (unless you look it up in the dictionary or something...CHEATERS!!!), but just an encompassment of a broad and fuzzy idea. That's my deal, anyway.


Introduction/Wellness
Name: Liz Bonovi
Date: //2002-03-18 14:22:08 :
Link to this Comment: 1503

Hi, my name is Liz Bonovitz. I'm a Sophomore Poli Sci major. I think wellness is the combination of physical, mental and emotional health. It seems like if you're missing one, you can't really be "well." Maybe it will be easier to pin down a definition of wellness after we're all done with this course...


Holistic Health
Name: Tasneem P.
Date: //2002-03-18 14:49:00 :
Link to this Comment: 1504

I'm Tasneem Paghdiwala, a sophomore English major. I think that wellness is a holistic idea,
a combination of physical, mental and some sort of broadly defined spiritual/philosophical
understanding. Without health in one area, the other areas can suffer, leaving you feeling
"unwell" or "sick" in a physical or mental way.


wellness
Name: Hedya Arya
Date: //2002-03-18 15:36:40 :
Link to this Comment: 1505

My name is Hedya Aryani. I'm a sophomore Sociology major. The concept of wellness extends throughout the physical, mental and emotional spheres to me. There needs to be a balance within each, while providing an overall sense of stability and health for an individual. How to reach these standards of health is what I hope to learn from this seminar...


intro
Name: Sara Press
Date: //2002-03-18 16:09:00 :
Link to this Comment: 1506

Hello, my name is Sara Press and I am a Junior economics major. Wellness, to me, means body, mind, and soul wellness, or feeling and looking healthy and happy (perhaps). I am really not too sure.


excitment
Name: Jennings
Date: //2002-03-18 16:16:45 :
Link to this Comment: 1507

I am very excited about this upcoming course. I am looking forward to learning alot all of the people introduced today in class seemed very knowledgable. I hope I can gain some of thier knowledge to better know my body and self by the end of this class.



Name: Ashley Gar
Date: //2002-03-18 16:41:51 :
Link to this Comment: 1508

Hi, my name is Ashley Garrigan, and I'm a sophomore Political Science major. Let's see...what does "wellness" mean to me? I feel like I should have a handle on this since I took that course for PE credit last semester. I guess I would say that wellness entails eating well as trying to do right by your body and mind.


intro
Name: Shanze Mun
Date: //2002-03-18 16:42:02 :
Link to this Comment: 1509

Hi, I'm Shanze. I'm a freshman. I'm from Pakistan but have lived almost all my life in the Philippines. I think wellness has to do with being physically and mentally fit.



Name: Nicole Pie
Date: //2002-03-18 16:57:34 :
Link to this Comment: 1510

Hi, my name is Nicole Pietras and I am a sophmore, Biology Major with a concentration in Neuroscience. I define "wellness" as the harmony of the mind and body. What this means is the brain and body functioning as one. When one of the two is not working properly due to lack of sleep, sickness, or stress, then the person is not considered "well".


Wellness
Name: Nana Ama A
Date: //2002-03-18 17:06:13 :
Link to this Comment: 1512

Hi,
My name is Nana Ama Adom-Boakye. Am a sophomore math and econ double major at Bryn Mawr. I guess my colleagues have said it all..Wellness is being fit physically and Mentally.


Wellness
Name: Monica Loc
Date: //2002-03-18 17:13:58 :
Link to this Comment: 1513

Hi! I am Monica Locsin and I am from the Philippines. I am currently a freshman at BMC and I plan on majoring in English or Political Science. I believe that wellness is about the way an individual is towards her health and personal well-being which includes her emotional outlook on life.


Wellness
Name: Molly Finn
Date: //2002-03-18 18:44:00 :
Link to this Comment: 1514

I'm Molly, a freshman, probably a hist of art or eng major. I think wellness means being conscious and centered in your body and mind. For me personally, wellness depends on whether or not I have creative outlets. Art is physically, emotionally, and spiritually therapeutic. If I'm not engaged in creative, intellectual work I get depressed.


Wellness
Name: Kate Lenah
Date: //2002-03-18 18:59:15 :
Link to this Comment: 1515

Hi, I'm Kate and I'm a sophomore Political Science and possible Spanish major. To me, wellness means having a balanced life so that your mind and body can function at its best. This includes eating right, exercising, having fun, having responsibility, having people you can count on...etc....


Intro
Name: Ana Salzbe
Date: //2002-03-18 20:20:42 :
Link to this Comment: 1516

I'm Ana Salzberg, a freshman. For me, "wellness" is a combination of emotional and physical well-being that can be affected and/or determined by outside factors.


Week 1
Name: Lelani
Date: //2002-03-18 21:09:10 :
Link to this Comment: 1517

Hey all. I'm Lelani--second year fine arts major. I'm not too sure how I would classify wellness...But I hope this seminar will help me get grounded and healthier--or at least force me to think about it more...:P


a greeting
Name: Rachel Wri
Date: //2002-03-19 00:11:14 :
Link to this Comment: 1519

Hi, I'm Rachel Wright, a junior English major with a concentration in creative writing. I spent last semester abroad in London and I feel like that time, coupled with the realization that I will be a senior next year, has shaped my current idea of what wellness is. Right now, i think that it means being physically fit, but as a means to an end, that end being a balance in life-- an attention to one's mental and emotional health through physical fitness and vice versa.


Wellness
Name: Jennifer V
Date: //2002-03-19 14:02:35 :
Link to this Comment: 1520

Hello, I'm Jennifer Vaughan, a sophomore physics and math major. Wellness seems to be a state in which one's physical, mental, and emotional conditions are all optimal or nearly so. The definition of optimal and the variation permitted will depend on the person and the situation.


Introduction
Name: Marie Brow
Date: //2002-03-19 18:55:33 :
Link to this Comment: 1521

My name is Marie Brown and I am a sophomore history major. I think it is interesting that most of the postings contain a three pronged definition to wellness: mind, body, and spirit. Until recently Western medicine has defined wellness simply in terms of the body. To be "well" was to be free of "disease" and "deformity." I would agree with everyone here in saying that wellness includes much more than just the physical body. However, I am hesitant about the linear imagery of "balance." I think Monday's comments about mind, body, and spirit operating in a circular fashion is much more accurate (although more difficult to grasp).


Wellness
Name: Barbara Ca
Date: //2002-03-19 19:36:56 :
Link to this Comment: 1523

Hi, my name is Barbara Cathcart and I'm a junior philosophy major. I think the term 'wellness' refers to a standard (both personal and social) for physical and, recently, psychological health. This standard is determined by the expectations and demands of our society and our own personal goals and ambitions. If our bodies and minds are healthy enough to allow us to pursue these goals and live up to these expectations, we consider ourselves 'well'- fit for the environment in which we find ourselves and for the life plan (however determinate) we have set for ourselves. This health standard is especially important to us today, since it is precisely how we judge a person's agency in court and, among other things, determine the distribution of health services.


Intro & Wellness
Name: Faye McGra
Date: //2002-03-19 22:03:16 :
Link to this Comment: 1525

Faye McGrath
2004
future philosophy major
At the moment, I think I would define wellness as the state of being "normal", when you have no mental or physical limitations, and can reasonably reach all of your goals.


wellness introduction
Name: Sarah G. K
Date: //2002-03-19 22:53:10 :
Link to this Comment: 1527

Hi, I'm a senior history major 2 months away from graduation, and pleased as plum about it. The ironic thing about health and well being is that no one really notices it enough to define it until they are unwell. No one really thinks 'wow, today im healthy', but when sick or injured, the status of your unwellness is very clear. I think it's important to be aware of one's wellness before it is too late.


Wellness
Name: Sherolyn O
Date: //2002-03-19 23:03:24 :
Link to this Comment: 1529

Hi, my name is Sherolyn and I'm a senior majoring in Psychology. When I think of wellness, the first thing that comes to mind is physical health. I think physical health is maintained by eating a balanced diet, exercising regularly and sleeping 6-8 hours a night. After reading some other comments, I realize that mental and emotional health are also important aspects of wellness. Since mental health and physical health seem to affect each other, we need to learn how to take care of our bodies and deal effectively with situations to maintain our wellness.


Wellness
Name: Greta Tess
Date: //2002-03-19 23:38:46 :
Link to this Comment: 1530

My name is Greta Tessman and I'm a junior psychology major/econ minor. As a woman that is now "twenty something", wellness has become more of a salient issue for me. It means not only eating properly, taking vitamins, exercising, and getting enough sleep, but also having an overall feeling of happiness and well-being. That means reducing stress, laughing, hanging out with friends--making time for myself. Wellness is 80% mental.



Name: aeronwy hu
Date: //2002-03-20 01:47:58 :
Link to this Comment: 1532

hi! my name's aeronwy. i'm a junior soc major, psych minor. over the past few years i've come to believe that wellness is largely dependent on happiness. it's not a very physical thing for me. it's more about how content you are with yourself, your life and environment. i think of dissatisfaction like a sickness that you need to treat just as much as you'd try to fix a bodily ailment. i don't think you can ever truly be well unless you are content.


Wellness
Name: Elizabeth
Date: //2002-03-20 10:31:33 :
Link to this Comment: 1536

My name is Liz Marcus and I'm a frosh. As of now I am throughly undecided in my major although I'm thinking of designing an independent major that deals with urban issues. To me wellness is a feeling of well-being, a feeling of energy and health. In order to acheive wellness, one's mind and body must oth be in good condition.


Hello Forum!
Name: Alia Prest
Date: //2002-03-20 10:35:03 :
Link to this Comment: 1537

Hey everyone! I'm Alia Preston, I'm a junior history major.
What about wellness? Well, I think that my answer will be basically the same as everyone elses, which doesn't shock me one bit. I look at wellness as a combination of physical, mental, emotional and spiritual health or atleast the constant strive for that health and balance. I view wellness as a fluid ideal that changes from person to person and can only be defined individually as a goal that is really rather vague and arbitrary.


Wellness
Name: Rabia Qure
Date: //2002-03-20 11:02:51 :
Link to this Comment: 1539

Good day. My name is Rabia Qureshi and I am a senior Political Science/Spanish major. Wellness seems to be an issue that is scrutinized mainly when one's health begins to deteriorate. I would prefer however to learn preventive healthcare means.



Name: Adrienne L
Date: //2002-03-20 11:37:57 :
Link to this Comment: 1540

My name is Adrienne and I'm a sophomore Physics major. I guess my idea of wellness is, as some people have already said on this forum, a combination of mental and physical health and well-being. It is a rather vague notion, and one that is a lot easier to envision than to actually define.


Forum Question for the Migraine Talk, Dr. Kerson
Name: Amy Campbe
Date: //2002-03-20 15:07:24 :
Link to this Comment: 1543

What, in your experience, contributes to headaches. How do you manage them and what lifestyle changes or lifestyle habits would help to minimize headaches. How do the habits of regular exercise, regular eating and getting enough sleep, contribute to minimizing stress, migraines, headaches etc.

If you suffer from headaches or migraines, try keeping a daily log tracking the amount of sleep you are getting, daily exercise and your eating habits.



Name:
Date: //2002-03-20 15:54:55 :
Link to this Comment: 1546

I'm a sophmore here at this place called Bryn Mawr College. What is wellness? I think this is clearly an idea open to total interpretation. Wellness seems to be more of idea that one concluded bythemselves. I think that suggestions can always be made to guide someone along the path of leading a life full of health and 'wellness'. However I believe the rules change for each person.


Sorry this may show up twice
Name: Jennifer P
Date: //2002-03-20 15:55:26 :
Link to this Comment: 1547

I'm a sophmore here at this place called Bryn Mawr College. What is wellness? I think this is clearly an idea open to total interpretation. Wellness seems to be more of idea that one concluded bythemselves. I think that suggestions can always be made to guide someone along the path of leading a life full of health and 'wellness'. However I believe the rules change for each person.


headaches
Name: Shanze
Date: //2002-03-20 16:10:30 :
Link to this Comment: 1548

I think lack of sleep, not eating properly, and too much stress contributes to headaches. In order to minimize headaches one needs to have a good amount of sleep, eat at least three meals a day, and balance out your workload and other things so that you are not under too much stress. These things contribute to minimize headaches because then there is not too much pressure on your body and it is not lacking anything (ex: food, sleep) and can function properly.


headaches
Name: ashley
Date: //2002-03-20 18:04:32 :
Link to this Comment: 1549

Well, I guess I am fortunate in that I don't really get headaches. When I do get them it tends to be if I haven't eaten or slept enough in quite a while. I guess then, just to echo our speaker today, that minimizing headaches could be helped by not abusing OTC or prescription medication, but instead using them responsibly as a response to a grade of headache, as well as regularly eating 3 meals a day and getting enough sleep.


headaches
Name: Kate Lenah
Date: //2002-03-20 18:13:11 :
Link to this Comment: 1550

I think stress is a major factor in contributing to headaches, but I don't really get them too often, so I don't really know. I know that when I'm tired or hungry, I'm definitely more prone to get headaches.


headaches
Name: Jennings
Date: //2002-03-20 18:30:36 :
Link to this Comment: 1551

classes usually give me a headache, but today's was really interesting. I enjoyed learning about the disease that plagues many of my friends. Today's speaker gave many interesting insights and I thouroughly enjoyed todays class.



Name: aeronwy hu
Date: //2002-03-20 20:04:11 :
Link to this Comment: 1552

in my own experience my headaches seem to be caused by my sleeping in awkward positions for a long period of time, or by my being in a small, noisy confined space for a long time. i don't know what categories you'd put these types of headaches in, i.e. tension or what.

since my headaches are usually one-time things that result from something i can specifically pick out, i don't think of them as needing to be managed. i don't alter my diet or exercise routine and all that kind of stuff to get rid of them. i just suffer it (say, as a consequence of going out to a rock concert) as part of my experience and remember not to do it again.


in general though (meaning for most people) i'm sure that there is very definitely a relationship between lifestyle habits and incidence of headaches. if there wasn't, then changes to your lifestyle wouldn't be prescribed as a way to treat those headaches. what those habits are, though, or what changes would need to be made to help, are things that i can't say. i'm sure it needs to be tweaked from patient to patient.


Headaches
Name: Hedya
Date: //2002-03-20 20:12:55 :
Link to this Comment: 1553

In my experience, the only headaches I've had to deal with are tension/stress-related and I rarely get them. When I do, I find them clearly connected to environmental factors (such as during finals week, after a heated argument, and more or less overwhelming situations). These times are usually associated with contributing headache factors such as the lack of a steady sleeping schedule or less than adequate nourishment. Obviously, to minimize the occurrence of headaches, I need a balance of these factors. Exercise helps to relieve stress by releasing endorphines , while eating/sleeping provides an individual with energy to function.


Headaches
Name: Liz Bonovi
Date: //2002-03-20 21:18:09 :
Link to this Comment: 1554

Luckily for me, I don't have headaches often. When I do get one, it's generally only when I'm sick with a cold. Resting and eating properly when I'm sick usually help me to get better and as I get better, any headache that I have goes away. In my experience the things that Amy mentioned: "regular exercise, regular eating and getting enough sleep, minimizing stress..." are key to staying healthy in general and will reduce that chance of getting a cold and therefore getting a headache that would come with it.


headaches
Name: Diana La F
Date: //2002-03-21 09:35:50 :
Link to this Comment: 1555

I usually get headaches after I've been studying or working hard. My eyes get strained, and I don't even realize it, then it's all gone. I get that terrible pounding that can only be helped with darkness and closing my eyes. All in all, a very good excuse not to do more work (hehe). There are times, though, when I get headaches from OVERsleeping. My head will just feel thick, and that's when getting outside and exercising helps me. I don't really understand why this is, or why my two normal headaches differ so greatly. I just know what works for them and when I get them, which is enough for me. I have friends who get mingrains, but they're usually caused by chocolate, which they have now cut from their diet entirely and suffer no longer. I don't know, maybe it's a Long Island thing...


Week 1 question
Name: Nicole Pie
Date: //2002-03-21 12:04:53 :
Link to this Comment: 1557

For me, I normally get headaches when I am stressed out, haven't slept enough, I look in a book or at my computer for long periods of time, mainly when my eyes are tired, or if i have too much sugar or chocolate(I absolutely love chocolate !!) Normally I know when a headache is coming on because my body warns me by sending a little pain to my head and then I know when to stop. When it deals with my eyes, if I take a nap or just close my eyes for a while it works. If it's because of too much sugar or chocolate, I stop eating it and take something for my headache. Since here at Bryn Mawr there is minimal time for sleep, eating well or working out that I'd have to say that I don't really know how those healthy habits contribute to not geting headaches, but if I had to make an assumption I would have to say that by having healthy habits would not contribute to having headaches.


Headaches
Name:
Date: //2002-03-21 16:53:26 :
Link to this Comment: 1558

I have only had a headache once in my life, that I recall. It was probably due to fatigue, and I think I was getting sick at the time, as well. I don't take any particular measures to avoid headaches; it seems I am just one of those people, as the speaker mentioned, with a high threshold for this particular condition. Any habit that contributes to one's overall health--exercise, eating well, etc.--should, it seems to me, help reduce the incidence or the severity of headaches.


Message above
Name: Jennifer V
Date: //2002-03-21 16:56:28 :
Link to this Comment: 1559

(Sorry, I reset and forgot to reenter my name. 1558 is mine.)


Migraine Headaches and Stress
Name: Monica Loc
Date: //2002-03-21 19:44:09 :
Link to this Comment: 1560

What, in your experience, contributes to headaches. How do you manage them and what lifestyle changes or lifestyle habits would
help to minimize headaches. How do the habits of regular exercise, regular eating and getting enough sleep, contribute to minimizing
stress, migraines, headaches etc.

I usually get headaches after sleeping with wet hair or studying too hard or watching too much TV. I don't watch as much TV now because of all the work I get so at least not all of my headaches are caused by watching too much TV. I barely get headaches in Bryn Mawr but when I do I know it is because of lack of sleep and too much work! I make sure that I eat properly because when I get hungry I also get headaches. I am still working on getting more sleep. I think that regular exercise and regualar eating and getting an adequate enough amount of sleep will definitely eliminate headaches.


Headaches
Name: nana ama a
Date: //2002-03-21 22:31:25 :
Link to this Comment: 1561

I get headaches more often than not because i never get enough sleep, i never make to to erdman for breakfast, and i am constantly stressed. From the last lecture, i think eating at least times a day, (and drinking enough water), exercising regularly, getting enough sleep and giving myself "study break" somtimes would help.


headaches
Name:
Date: //2002-03-22 01:34:18 :
Link to this Comment: 1562

I thought that I got a lot of headaches but listening to the lecture, I realize that I dont have migraines and there are others out there who suffer greatly. Some of the greatest causes of my headaches seem to be either lack of sleep/too much sleep, when I smell something wrong and noxious, being in a poorly ventilated area, and if I'm in the sun too long.

Usually, I try not to take medicine (ie. Tylenol, Advil), unless my headache interferes with my activities.


last post mine.......sorry
Name: Sarah Kim
Date: //2002-03-22 01:35:11 :
Link to this Comment: 1563

i forgot to add my name! hopefully we'll all get the hang of this soon


headaches and hello
Name: Lois McAff
Date: //2002-03-22 11:16:21 :
Link to this Comment: 1564

Hi - I haven't introduced myself yet, I'm Lois, a McBride student taking the seminars for a phys ed. credt.


I have found it to be true that I get less headaches now that I'm not "taking something" everytime I think I have a headache - I think the "rebound headache" is a fact. I also find it to be true that by incorporating exercize in my daily routine - I feel the effects of stress much less on my body, and results are less headaches.


Headaches
Name: Marie Brow
Date: //2002-03-22 11:18:52 :
Link to this Comment: 1565

I found the migraine lecture incredibly informative!! Headaches run in my family. My grandfather, aunt, mom, and myself are all plagued with them fairly consistently. Eating right and getting enough sleep is certainly important, but so is one's environment. My aunt and grandfather both have/had daily headaches relating to their jobs. For the last 5 years that he worked, my grandfather had terrible migraines daily. He retired and hasn't had them since. I get migraines and used to have them almost daily. The past two years my headaches have really reduced in frequency. I've figured out why: attending Bryn Mawr has removed me from the major stressors at home. To be sure, Bryn Mawr has its own stress and tensions but they rarely induce migraines. Unfortunately, when I go home for the summers, I get migraines more often. To me this is an excellent example of a mind body connection. The tense mental environment I face at home manifests itself in my migraines. When I am removed from the environment, I feel an increased sense of wellness.


Headaches
Name: Rabia
Date: //2002-03-23 12:42:51 :
Link to this Comment: 1567

Everyone seems to get headaches at one time or another. I, for instance, always seem to get headaches around my menstrual cycle and when I oversleep. In my experience, when one's routine is disrupted, one usually gets a headache or falls ill somehow. As far as exercise is concerned, the mind and body both have to be healthy for the entire person to be healthy and to function properly. When I have a headache, I usually drink some honey. It may sound unorthodox, but it hasn't failed me yet. Also, regular eating and an overall routine help to keep the body healthy, as well as staying away from harmful substances like drugs or alcohol.


Migraines
Name: Sara Press
Date: //2002-03-24 12:14:46 :
Link to this Comment: 1568

The lecture on Migraines was really interesting and informational. I learned a lot about headaches and found the information about caffeine especially interesting. I never knew what was in excedrin or why, now I have a fun fact. And I also dont feel so bad about having coffee in the morning, at least I do not drink twenty cups a day. I haven't had headaches in a while, and hope that with some of the information I learned on Wednesday I can prevent future headaches.


headaches
Name: Ana Salzbe
Date: //2002-03-24 17:36:07 :
Link to this Comment: 1569

In my experience, headaches are caused by stress and lack of sleep. Also, I often get sinus headaches. Whenever I get a headache, I take an aspirin and try to find some time to get some extra sleep.


Headaches
Name: Greta Tess
Date: //2002-03-24 22:40:26 :
Link to this Comment: 1574

Most of my headaches are the result of a lack of sleep or stress. I try to get a consistent amount of sleep every night which reduces the sleep-related headaches. Exercising usually helps to get my mind off of the stressful events, increases blood flow in my body, and leaves me with more energy. I use exercise as a preventative measure against body aches and pains in general. When all else fails, a trip to Starbucks is a sure and quick way to rid myself of headaches--and thanks to Dr. Kerson's comments about the positive effects of caffeine on headaches--a guilt-free trip!


Introduction and Migraines
Name: Celestina
Date: //2002-03-25 03:31:19 :
Link to this Comment: 1575

Well I will introduce myself quickily since I haven't done so...
I am a Senior and my major is Growth and Structure of Cities, next year I will be teaching with Teach For America in New york city. Wellness to me is an overall concern and actions one takes to preserve a physically and mentally balanced self.
As for the headache lecture, I have always suffered from very painful migraines since the age of 7. I don't know why but my mother has always had them as well. My migraines were so bad that my grandmother had a stack of scarfs around the house for me. Whenever I would get a migraine I would immediately tie a scarf as tight as I could around my head. This would relieve it a little, but not by much. I would then immediately take a nap. I really don't know what causes my migraine. Stress does not really cause them all too much. I think anything and everything could set off a migraine depending on my mood. If I sleep too much, I get a migraine. If I don't sleep enough within a week by Sunday I'll have a migraine. I haven't really done anything to help my migraines because I don't have a list of things that really causes them. It can change from week to week. Fortunately, I don't get them as bad as I used to and now I have one every other two weeks sometimes only once a month.


Introduction and Migraines
Name: Celestina
Date: //2002-03-25 03:31:29 :
Link to this Comment: 1576

Well I will introduce myself quickily since I haven't done so...
I am a Senior and my major is Growth and Structure of Cities, next year I will be teaching with Teach For America in New york city. Wellness to me is an overall concern and actions one takes to preserve a physically and mentally balanced self.
As for the headache lecture, I have always suffered from very painful migraines since the age of 7. I don't know why but my mother has always had them as well. My migraines were so bad that my grandmother had a stack of scarfs around the house for me. Whenever I would get a migraine I would immediately tie a scarf as tight as I could around my head. This would relieve it a little, but not by much. I would then immediately take a nap. I really don't know what causes my migraine. Stress does not really cause them all too much. I think anything and everything could set off a migraine depending on my mood. If I sleep too much, I get a migraine. If I don't sleep enough within a week by Sunday I'll have a migraine. I haven't really done anything to help my migraines because I don't have a list of things that really causes them. It can change from week to week. Fortunately, I don't get them as bad as I used to and now I have one every other two weeks sometimes only once a month.



Name: Elizabeth
Date: //2002-03-25 12:06:24 :
Link to this Comment: 1578

For me, the biggest cause of headahes is fatigue. These are also the headahes that are the worst. Allergies and not eatting properly also are a large causes of headaches for me. For me, the easiest way to fix these are to make sure I get enough sleep and proper meals. The only harder ones to deal with are the allergy ones. Those are easier to just let run their course. With regular exercise and other healthy habits, many headahes can be eliminated. This especially true for non-reoccurring headaches.


headache mania
Name: molly finn
Date: //2002-03-25 18:46:06 :
Link to this Comment: 1584

I have to admit I indulge in eight hours of sleep every night and breakfast every morning. And somehow my life hasn't miraculously become perfect. Stress is the biggest reason for my getting headaches I believe. I also if I have a long day without time to calm down and relax...that sounds like a stress issue too.


Headaches
Name: Meghan Lam
Date: //2002-03-26 22:04:02 :
Link to this Comment: 1602

Hi, I haven't yet introduced myself. I am a senior double major in French and Italian. The headache seminar was wonderfully informative. I find that I get headaches after a)drinking too much coffee and b)staring at the computer screen for too long. I have always attributed my rare headaches to eye strain from reading in poor light, or to stuffy environments, etc. One of the most interesting things Dr. Kerson mentioned in his lecture was the "drug rebound" headache. I realized that several years ago, when I was taking 4 to 10 Advil or Ibuprofen per day, that my headaches were most probably due to the excessive amounts of headache medication I was taking. As a very minor whole-foods nut, I loved seeing the connection between foods and headaches, showing that what you put in your body really can affect how you feel.


introduction and headaches
Name: Kristina D
Date: //2002-03-26 22:30:05 :
Link to this Comment: 1603

Hi, I'm Kris Davis and I am a Political Science major. Our last seminar was very interesting to college students as we usually commit most of the don'ts on the list. Previously, I had not thought much about a connection between food and headaches. There were always the obvious links like alcohol and caffeine but i did not realize that cheese or peanut butter could trigger migraines.


headaches
Name: Shanti Mik
Date: //2002-03-27 00:09:42 :
Link to this Comment: 1605

What, in your experience, contributes to headaches. How do you manage them and what lifestyle changes or lifestyle habits would help to minimize headaches. How do the habits of regular exercise, regular eating and getting enough sleep, contribute to minimizing stress, migraines, headaches etc.

In my experience, headaches are mostly due to stress and anxiety. I used to get headaches more frequently when I didn't vent my stress in any one outlet. I started exercising more and I found that that became my outlet for stress and it helped reduce my headaches. I also found that when my body was stressed, by me not eating well or not sleeping well, that it manifested itself in headaches. I tried to make my habits more regular and it helped me reduce my stress level in general. Your body feels a lack of sleep and a bad diet as stresses upon it and so its important to get a reasonable amount of rest and to realize that though your busy, its important to take some time to eat.


Wellness
Name: Irum Shehr
Date: //2002-03-27 00:28:43 :
Link to this Comment: 1607

Hello. I am a Senior Sociology major. For me, wellness is having a certain sense of balance between my mind. body and spirit. It is to feel an overall sense of ease in the environment I spend most of my time in, and to not be physically ill, or be facing extreme mental stress. Wellness doesn't necessarily mean a situation that is completely stress free or without any physical discomfort, but a time and feeling where one on the whole feels healthy and able to cope with life's problems.


Headaches
Name: Irum Shehr
Date: //2002-03-27 00:34:18 :
Link to this Comment: 1608

I am extremely prone to headaches! I just lost my glasses - which I need to watch tv, read, just for about everything - because I have astigmatism and my headaches are worse! I tend to get headaches more when I am not sleeping/eating well - ie during exam, big paper due and other high stress times. I also get heachaches from the sun. I try to balance my diet to the best of my ability, and also to get as much sleep as possible(nowhere near as much as I would like!!!!). I have recently started taking a dance class and I find that the physical acitivity helps in reducing headsches.

When I get headaches I usually tend to take exedrin or exedrin migraine for serious ones. I also try to nap for a while.


Headaches
Name: Sherolyn O
Date: //2002-03-27 00:50:34 :
Link to this Comment: 1609

Fortunately, I do not get headaches very often. The few times I remember getting a headache were when I was suffering from a lot of stress and wasn't getting enough sleep during the week. I would imagine that the habits of regular exercise, eating, and sleeping have a positive influence on minimizing stress and headaches. Engaging in a lifestyle of consistent exercise, healthy eating, and normal sleeping patterns would reduce one's chances of getting headaches, or lessen the severity of the symptoms.


headaches
Name:
Date: //2002-03-27 02:02:47 :
Link to this Comment: 1610

I am another one of those lucky people who suffers very rarely from headaches, though I have had a migraine twice in my life (my mom also has had them extremely infrequently). The first time, I had pushed my body way beyond its exercise limit, an argument for respecting a my body's level of fitness while exercising, and the second time, I had suffered an injury to the jaw so I had some facial trauma that set it off.

Generally speaking though, my headaches are caused by tension, though I think that dehydration also plays a huge part in headaches. I used to drink a lot of soda (which dehydrates) but since switching to water as my primary drink of choice, I have far fewer headaches. In fact, I can tell if I've had too little water in a given day if my head hurts. As for true tension headaches, I try to take a few minutes to destress, and if that doesn't work, I do resort to advil.



Name: Jennifer
Date: //2002-05-03 14:39:37 :
Link to this Comment: 2051

Sleep Deprivation is talked about too much on this campus. I think each student needs to decided for themselves wther they need to stop and go to bed. The people who keep going have deeper problemes. The ones who make a point to tell everyone in the trico about their work load and over-flowing back pack ar absolutely annoying!


What wellness means
Name: Mariah Sch
Date: //2002-03-27 10:15:46 :
Link to this Comment: 1612

Hi, my name is Mariah and I'm a senior chem major. For me, wellness is a balance between mental, physical and emotional health. The three seem to be in a feedback loop in which each feeds into the wellness or illness of the other.


headaches
Name: Mariah Sch
Date: //2002-03-27 10:22:33 :
Link to this Comment: 1613

Although I am fortunate and do not often get headaches, when I do it is often the result of external factors such as weather changes or allergies. Occasionally gettin too little or too much sleep or stress cause headaches. I feel that maintaining overall wellness, balance and routine in one's life can reduce the occurance of many kinds of headaches.


headaches and stress
Name: Barbara Ca
Date: //2002-03-27 10:37:22 :
Link to this Comment: 1614

Although I don't usually suffer from headaches, I was able to pass on some of the information we got at the seminar last week to friends and family who do. It was interesting to learn about some of the causes of headaches, especially the effects of strong odors (perfume and cigarettes) and stress that builds up over the day. This just gives me another reason to try to plan ahead, eat regular meals, and stay on a more stable and balanced schedule.


headaches
Name: Abby Mathe
Date: //2002-03-27 11:29:24 :
Link to this Comment: 1615

Though I do not usually get headaches, I went to class last Wednesday with one. It was interesting to hear about some of the causes of migraines - especially the effect that strong odors and foods may have. I realize in retrospect that many of my headaches occur when someone on my hall is burning incense or when I walk past a perfume counter, and I wonder if some of those headaches could actually have been migraines. I also got proof that some headaches may be caused by the sufferer's own occupation with the subject - as soon as I left the class and stopped thinking about headaches, my own pain vanished.


headaches
Name: Alia Prest
Date: //2002-03-27 11:59:17 :
Link to this Comment: 1617

Thankfully, even though I do sometimes get headaches, I don't have problems often, nor do I get chronic migranes. I do notice that my headaches are directly related to my stress level.


Serotonin
Name: Margot
Date: //2002-03-27 13:19:48 :
Link to this Comment: 1618

After the talk on Anxiety today, I find myself very interested in Serotonin. I remember hearing about it in HS as the "happy" chemical in the brain, which makes (some) sense when thinking about depression. But I am still unsure as to how it functions in relation to anxiety...and how the drugs function in relation to serotonin. I know this is a big subject, but any underlying principles about serotonin and what it does in relation to depression and anxiety would be helpful. I will also look into in on the Web, so any thoughts on good sites would be nice too. Thanks!


anxiety
Name: emiko sait
Date: //2002-03-27 13:59:09 :
Link to this Comment: 1619

Re: Anxiety
We discussed the issue of anxiety disorders this afternoon, but we were unable to touch upon the topic of anxiety as a symptom of other pathologies or disorders. I am curious about how anxiety relates to other disorders and how that effects the physiological side of those disorders.
Also, We briefly discussed cognitive/behavioral interventions used in the treatment of OCD and PTSD but did not touch upon the numerous types of treatments available and thier efficacy. For instance, there is still alot of controversy about how exposure treatments of PTSD should progress. A person in the audience brought up the weekend retreat intervention for OCD, would such severe and quick exposure to the object of fear be more detrimental to the sufferer than it would be helpful?


Forum question - Anxiety Talk
Name: Amy Campbe
Date: //2002-03-27 15:13:04 :
Link to this Comment: 1620

How significant a role does anxiety play in your life and what strategies have you found useful to reduce anxiety?

You're free to write about other relevant thoughts/questions that
might have occured to you.

Next week, The Mind Body Connection continues with a talk and discussion about the important relationship between exercise and good mental health. Cookies, fruit and coffee/tea will be available before the class. Come early- enjoy a cookie and fruit.


Anxiety
Name: Hedya
Date: //2002-03-27 15:41:25 :
Link to this Comment: 1621

I've actually paid a lot of attention to my patterns of anxiety this year. Although the anxiety I experience is not at the level of a disorder, I have noticed that I tend to worry about things a little more than I really need to, and there were a few characteristics that were pointed out in the talk today that I have noticed in myself, such as irritability/restlessness/needing things to be very neat and symmetrical/etc., during high-stress times. To deal with that, I began doing exactly what was mentioned with making priority lists, as well as trying to identify what would make me start worrying incessantly about certain situations, and I feel as if I've now been able to approach stressful tasks with greater ease.


Social Causes for Anxiety
Name: Anne Dalke
Date: //2002-03-27 15:46:20 :
Link to this Comment: 1622

I'm a faculty member who attended today's presentation on Anxiety by Earl Thomas and Elna Yadin. I was interested in Amy Campbell's follow-up query about how we might manage our own mental health, and Paul Grobstein's observation that, in doing so, we might think of a continuum stretching from pharmacological and psychiatric methods down through self-intiatives such as taking a walk or listening to music. I'd like to recommend extending that continuum considerably, @ the other end, to suggest that there are often social causes for anxiety or anxiety disorders, which might best be addressed not by personal "healing," by trying to make yourself somehow feel "better" or less "anxious," but rather by working to change the causes, the triggers--hey: the world! This is really just an extension of my comment, during the discussion period, about the sort of "rational" fears which can be addressed by social action. If, for example, the events of September 11th have made you anxious, perhaps educating yourself into the range of possible causes for those events, and acting to intervene to change them...might help your anxiety. And help to "heal" some much larger issues along the way.
Anne Dalke


week 1&2
Name: Lelani
Date: //2002-03-27 16:13:59 :
Link to this Comment: 1623

These seminars are interesting to me because I learn things I didn't know before. Most of the science escapes me, but the general FYI stuff is extremely useful.

At the seminar about headaches, I realized that I shouldn't really be popping a pill when I merely *sense* an oncoming headache. But I'm such a pill person, to be honest. I really appreciate the quick fix.

And once again, the issue of turning too quickly to some pharmaceutical solution came up. And I think that it was very reassuring to hear that people are turning more to therapy or cog. psych. to learn how to deal with their problems rather than immediately asking for a perscription. But at the same time I feel kind of hypocritical for saying that because I swear that I have a pill for every ailment in my room.


anxiety
Name: Shanze
Date: //2002-03-27 19:57:00 :
Link to this Comment: 1624

Anxiety doesn't really play a major role in my life. I usually get anxious during exams and when I have too much work but other than that, I don't get so anxious. When I get anxious I try to balance out the things that I need to do so that I don't have a lot to do for one day but when that doesn't help I do things that will make me less anxious such as going out to watch a movie or listening to music or sleeping.


Anxiety Seminar
Name: Nicole
Date: //2002-03-27 21:32:56 :
Link to this Comment: 1626

This year I have been noticing my own anxiety levels more. I think that is because I have been putting more stress on myself then I need to. In order to manage this, I normally take a min. to relax and then make a list of everything I have to do, so I can actually see how much work I have. By doing this I have been successful in reducing my anxiety.



Name: ashley
Date: //2002-03-27 21:44:39 :
Link to this Comment: 1627

I don't really experience anxiety so much as I would say stress (I think those are different, aren't they?). This comes when I have too much work to do or overwhelming issues in my private life. Usually I try to take a break or go to sleep. Unfortunately, the stress is brought on because I don't have time to take a break or go to sleep.



Name: aeronwy
Date: //2002-03-27 23:56:12 :
Link to this Comment: 1629

anxiety is always a factor in my life. i don't think there is really a time when it is never not there; there are only relative degrees of its presence. there are so many things that i worry about or feel guilty over or get frustrated with, and that all results in anxiety. anxiety has kind of normalized for me so that i've come to feel like it's a part of me. it's strange because people don't think of me as a "worrywart" (what a weird expression, by the way). i think that's because the things i worry about aren't necessarily topical, like the aids crisis in africa, or when we're going to get peace in the middle east. i stress over money, and my grades, my parents, my prospects post-graduation, my parents, my love life, my jobs, my parents... basically, my worries manifest themselves in a more personal context, so people usually treat me as though i need encouragement or a confidence boost more than anything else.

since i've grown up feeling what is now a normalized level of anxiety, i don't necessarily want to separate myself from that. my worries do serve to motivate me sometimes and my habit of analyzing all the aspects of my life gives me a sense of clarity about where things stand, which i appreciate, even if it does cause some concern at times. i guess that means i'm "managing" my anxiety just fine.


anxiety
Name: Diana La F
Date: //2002-03-28 01:07:42 :
Link to this Comment: 1630

Yes, I have way to much anxiety. But I also know that this anxiety pushes me to do things I need to do, such as the 5 page paper I just finished...I know somewhere in the back of my mind that I am worrying about something that is not going to kill me, although I do try to convince myself it will sometimes. I find that I need this motivation, much as I hate feeling anxious. I am a pretty laid back person, I don't let much get to me. I worry about the future, about what others think about me, but who doesn't? And I've learned that the best way to get over this is to try to convince others through your actions that you do not feel this way. Sometimes I'm even able to convince myself for a time


Anxiety
Name: emiko sait
Date: //2002-03-28 10:19:59 :
Link to this Comment: 1631

How significant a role does anxiety play in your life and what strategies have you found useful to reduce anxiety?
I feel that anxiety has a very useful role. It helps to motivate me to accomplish the things that need to get done. When my anxieties cross the boundary between useful and distressful, I often prioritize the things I need to accomplish and try to be more forgiving of myself in letting a few things slide.



Name: Jennings
Date: //2002-03-28 22:09:23 :
Link to this Comment: 1634

I have never really suffered extreme stress or anxiety before, but after listening to Wed lecture I am defenatly more sympathetic to my friends that have. The lecture was most exciting with the husband/wife tag team. It was so great to get the expertise of both rolled into one lecture.


Anxiety
Name: Jennifer V
Date: //2002-03-29 12:20:01 :
Link to this Comment: 1636

I wouldn't say that anxiety plays a large role in my life, but it does play a useful one. I am usually anxious about whether I've forgotten something, or whether I'm going to be late for something; to deal with that sort of anxiety, I make an effort to be conscientious about my responsibilities, so I can trust that no, I haven't forgotten anything, or yes, I did leave enough time. I also make frequent use of priority lists, again to reassure myself that I have been keeping track of everything. By staying organized, I can plan time to just relax and do something fun, which also helps reduce anxiety.


Anxiety
Name: Ana
Date: //2002-03-30 09:21:39 :
Link to this Comment: 1638

I have been very fortunate in that anxiety has never been a major concern for me. When I feel myself getting too stressed out, I step back from whatever situation I'm dealing with and evaluate it - I find that looking at a situation objectively can be very helpful.


Anxiety
Name: Nana Ama A
Date: //2002-03-30 09:55:31 :
Link to this Comment: 1639

Anxiety is part of my life and am learning to live with it. I would like to know the correlation between anxiety and depression.


Anxiety/depression ... and stress
Name: Paul Grobstein
Date: //2002-03-31 10:58:18 :
Link to this Comment: 1642

We'll have a chance to talk a little more about anxiety/stress in relation to depression a week from Wednesday. In the meanwhile, a few thoughts picking up from Anne Dalke's. Anxiety DOES frequently have "usefulness", as Earl Thomas and Elna Yadin and several of you have said ... its the way that one part of the nervous system prepares itself for challenges and alerts the rest of the nervous system to their existence so one is "conscious" of them. External stress can do the same thing, often through the intermediary of anxiety.


In that context, the issues are should one attempt to lessen anxiety?, and if so, how? Sometimes, for a variety of reasons, anxiety levels get out of control, bear no useful relationship to actual "challenges", and indeed make it harder to respond to challenges. Those are the situations where it is particularly important to get professional help, which may involve psychotherapy and/or psychopharmacology (frequently both). That help of these kinds is available is an important advance in 20th century health care. Its important to be aware of it as a possibility, for oneself and others, and to know that debilitating anxiety is not necessarily a person's "fault" or a moral failing.


What about the more ordinary, less extreme cases of anxiety, where, for example, there may be clear and relevant external stresses? A good trick in this case is to "get them under control". This may mean making a list, so one knows consciously what is causing anxiety and can work systematically at meeting the challenges. It may also mean consciously and deliberately "taking a break" (a walk, a nap, listening to music, exercising), The important thing here (in my experience at least) is to REALLY take a break ... to be able to tell onself, and have oneself believe, that one has, for a time, worked hard enough at meeting the challenges and one NEEDS/is entitled to some time away from them.


Anne Dalke's important point though was that challenges aren't always to be taken at face value as something one has to live up to. Sometimes challenges represent serious problems in the world in which one is living. As Anne pointed out, these sorts of anxieties are probably best dealt with not by trying to make them go away but rather by using them as a source of energy to try and bring about changes in the world. In this case, it is probably even MORE important to know how to take a break from "meeting the challenges", since changing the world isn't usually easy.


In a csem class last semester we talked a bit about a relevant local case, a tendency of people at the College (and elsewhere in American culture) to take pride in their ability to handle stress. Several students pointed out that this itself increases stress and hence anxiety. Maybe, without fully recognizing what we are doing, we create for ourselves and each other a cultural context which includes anxiety-provoking components? If so, maybe we could all work together on some changes which would reduce anxiety for each of us as individuals as well as for all of us as a community?


Anxiety
Name: Barbara Ca
Date: //2002-03-31 15:40:13 :
Link to this Comment: 1644

Although I try to remain as stress free as possible, I have to admit that anxiety plays a huge role in my life. When I don't plan ahead and do my work in stages for a big assignment, I am constantly nervous until I finally sit down and do it. Procrastination, I think, is a sure-fire way to live in a constant state of anxiety. I think the trick is just to sit down for a few minutes every day and get a little bit of it done.

Working out and singing are also good ways for me to calm myself down. By adding exercise hours and choir to my schedule (as firmly as classes), I have some regular, guilt-free time to enjoy myself, while also doing something good for my body and soul. It is always much easier to begin work again after taking a break like this.


anxiety
Name: Marie Brow
Date: //2002-03-31 17:43:56 :
Link to this Comment: 1646

I'm a little confused about this experience of anxiety that everyone seems to share. I don't think I've ever experienced it. I get very stressed out but I've never had any of the physical symptons described. I do make a large amount of lists, complete with boxes to check off. Checking off the boxes gives me a sense of calm. I think the idea about a graduated spectrum of anxiety is very accurate. Perhaps part of the reason I don't experience what I would define as anciety is because I make concentrated efforts to spend a bit of quiet time with myself each day.


Anxiety
Name: Irum Shehr
Date: //2002-03-31 20:14:44 :
Link to this Comment: 1647

Anxiety is a large part of everyday existence. It is that feeling you get when you havent finished the paper that is due tomorrow - or studied enough for an upcoming test. It is also when one is feelies worried about life in general and over things that we have no control over. I tend to worry - but not to the point where it beings to affect me physically. My philosophy is that worrying about something never gets it done - so if its something i can fix - i fix it - and if its something i cant - i try and think it through, and then push it out of my time. by spending time with friends and having time to myself every day - i find that i can reduce the amount of axiety i experience.


Anxiety
Name: Monica Loc
Date: //2002-03-31 20:16:03 :
Link to this Comment: 1648

Anxiety does not really play a role in my life. I try to balance things out in my life in such a way that I don't get too stressed. I mean there are times when I am anxious and overly stressed because of work and other things but I really try to not let it get the best of me. I enjoy going out with friends, talking to someone on the phone or just getting a nice relaxing massage or facial to not feel stressed.

How significant a role does anxiety play in your life and what strategies have you found useful to reduce anxiety?

You're free to write about other relevant thoughts/questions that
might have occured to you.


Anxiety
Name: Monica Loc
Date: //2002-03-31 20:16:19 :
Link to this Comment: 1649

Anxiety does not really play a role in my life. I try to balance things out in my life in such a way that I don't get too stressed. I mean there are times when I am anxious and overly stressed because of work and other things but I really try to not let it get the best of me. I enjoy going out with friends, talking to someone on the phone or just getting a nice relaxing massage or facial to not feel stressed.


anxiety
Name: Sarah G. K
Date: //2002-03-31 22:49:44 :
Link to this Comment: 1650

Prior to the seminar, I always thought that I had some type of anxiety problem/issue. It is interesting that people have areas of their life in which anxiety is a major issue, but it isn't enough to restrict them from doing other things or disrupting the basic pattern of their life; that is the definition of a 'disorder'. So now I know that I'm allowed to say that I have anxiety problems, but it's definitely not a disorder.


Anxiety
Name: Sherolyn O
Date: //2002-03-31 23:36:35 :
Link to this Comment: 1651

Anxiety has been playing a greater role in my life these days. My anxiety level has significantly increased during the course of my senior year. I didn't even realize how stressed I was until my left jaw starting hurting a couple months ago. I visited the dentist, and he told me that some people exhibit their stress through clenching their jaw and grinding their teeth at night. Since I grind my teeth at night, my jaw muscles have been overexercised and hurt during the day. To solve this problem, I'm getting a mouthguard which will protect my worn out teeth. Anxiety has also affected my sleep throughout this year. There are so many things on my mind that I can't seem to fall asleep right away. I always run through a mental checklist of what I have to do the next day. To reduce my worries, I've been writing out a checklist right before I go to sleep. By having everything on paper, it lessens my feelings of anxiety and helps me fall asleep quickly.


Anxiety
Name: Liz Bonovi
Date: //2002-04-01 00:19:24 :
Link to this Comment: 1652

For me, anxiety is a great motivator. Although I don't experience most of the symptoms we discussed in class, it definitely helps me to start my work on time and remember important things. To reduce anxiety, I try to make lists to keep track of what I have to do. Also, I like to exercise or relax with friends for a few hours. I find that worrying about work is definitely not helpful because that just takes time away from completing my work or having fun.


Anxitey
Name: Nana Ama A
Date: //2002-04-01 10:18:41 :
Link to this Comment: 1654

Anxiety plays am moajor part in my life. I not too sure i can "cure" it so am learning how to live with and deal with anxtiety. My anxiety problem can be attributed to my school work... i spend more time worrying about my school work than i spend doign it. i spend a huge chunk of my time worrying about getting a of after graduation, getting into grad school and all. Family and relationship problems also get me very anxious.
Basically am learning to spend my time doing things to solve my problems or the things am anxious about than think about them.


Anxiety
Name: Alia Prest
Date: //2002-04-01 12:09:23 :
Link to this Comment: 1657

I think that for me anxiety, but more specifically stress, plays a role in my life, but I don't think that my life has been overtaken by anxiety. I, as with most people, have moments of extreme anxiety and there are certain triggers that make me start to feel anxious--public speaking or important exams. I reduce my anxiety by sepereating myself from what is making me feel anxious, if even for a short time, in order to regroup and I also find that if I maintain a regular sleep cycle and meals then I am better equipt to deal with my anxiety. Still, I think that this is something manageable and my feelings of anxiety reduce everytime I come up against such a situation. At the same time, I can understand anxiety disorders and the type of feelings that could make someone retreat into their house, never to come out again.


Anxiety
Name: Rabia
Date: //2002-04-02 09:44:32 :
Link to this Comment: 1674

The anxiety talk was really interesting. I think the one thing I took away from it all was that we must prioritize our time in order to prevent feeling too anxious. As students, anxiety is most likely a common occurrence, but in a way it is a motivating factor as well. Sometimes, I do get sharp pains in my heart and feel dizzy, but this is when I am most anxious. To calm myself down, I just take a breath and have a seat. It does wonders sometimes to just sit and relax. The body really responds well to it I believe.


Anxiety
Name: Celestina
Date: //2002-04-02 09:57:48 :
Link to this Comment: 1675

Anxiety has played a huge role in my life, unfortunately. I am the type of person to be easily stressed out. My second semester of my freshman year I had my first ever panic attack during Calculus attack. I thought I was dying. Since that time, I've realized that I become too stressed about little things. Now, in order to overcome anxiety, I have a glass of juice, take a break, and try to momentarily forget what it is I'm stressing about. After taking a nice relaxing break for whatever it is, I try and tackle the problem and come up with my own solution to fixing whatever it is that stresses me out. Just the idea of having a plan to tackle to problem tends to create a lot more worry-free days in my life here at college.


Anxiety
Name: Shanti Mik
Date: //2002-04-02 10:50:19 :
Link to this Comment: 1676

Anxiety doesn't play a large part in my life. I used to feel myself getting anxious for a test or paper but I've tried to not worry about it. Excessively worrying about an assignment adds more to anxiety than actually having the paper. The less I thought about all the work I had to do and the more I just did it, the less anxious I became. Exercise has been a big help in reducing anxiety. First it releases endorphins and second its way for you to take out stress and anxiety. The physical exertion can just be a good release for all your stress. But my biggest strategy has been to just face all my tasks calmly and to look ahead. Its always much easier to get stressed out if you spend too much time worrying about things.


Anxiety
Name: Meghan
Date: //2002-04-02 11:32:03 :
Link to this Comment: 1677

I am surprised at how well most of the participants in this forum deal with anxiety, which is definitely a big part of my life. My senior year has been a MOST anxious time for me, because there is so much to do, and because there are so many expectations coming from so many directions. I do try to prioritize, but I also found that making lists increased my anxiety, because it allowed me to write down every tiny thing I needed to (or thought I "should") do, thereby reducing the effectiveness of lists. It was interesting to see that, like headaches, anxiety can manifest itself in many different forms, and that, again, eating well and taking time to relax or exercize can sometimes and often help. I think in many ways that getting out of college will greatly alleviate my levels of anxiety, and allow me to enjoy my life a lot more.


Anxiety
Name: Greta Tess
Date: //2002-04-02 11:48:56 :
Link to this Comment: 1678

Anxiety plays a small role in my life. I get anxious before exams, when doing knew things, etc., but I have learned how to manage my anxiety so it does not have drastic effects. I've found that rationalizing through problems or potential problems helps to settle me down both physically and psychologically. Luckily, anxiety has never been such a large part of my life that I have required outside assistance or the use of anxiolytics.


anxiety
Name: Lois McAff
Date: //2002-04-02 16:00:24 :
Link to this Comment: 1681

Anxiety is a part of life. It's recognizing it and coping with it that requires awareness and thought. I cope with anxiety by trying to distance myself from the feeling a little - what am I really anxious about? What, if anything needs to be done to relieve it? If taking care of what I need to do, such as writing that paper I'm procrasting about doesn't relieve it..then maybe something else is going on. I'll listen to music, walk, exercize, relax, talk to friends, bathe, and a multitude of other ways to relax naturally and center myself. That's it. Accept what we can't change, try to find courage to change what we can...and live this wonderful and beautiful adventure we call life.



Name: Elizabeth
Date: //2002-04-02 17:14:00 :
Link to this Comment: 1682

Anxiety is one aspect of my life that has always been fairly manageble. In order to reduce and eliminate anxiety I run. This helps a lot! The anxiety that I do have in my life plays the role of motivating me. For example, if I'm concerned about getting a paper done, then I'll be more likely to do to early in order to eliminate the anxiety. The only time that I find anxiety becomes an issue is when everything piles up and they are thins I can't control. Then relaxing with friends is a good solution.


Anxiety
Name: Natalie
Date: //2002-04-02 18:24:34 :
Link to this Comment: 1683

Anxiety has played a large role in my life in the past few years. Anxiety related disorders run in my family and I have been on and off medication for panic attacks as well as a general anxiety disorder. While most of the time I can keep stress to a managable level, I will often find myself sick with worry and doing things to avoid any extra causes of stress- however silly they may seem. Avoiding social situations and carefully distracting myself have seemed to work in the past few years. Not all anxiety is bad however, as some previous posts have discussed. Without that knot in my stomach when it gets time for work to be done, I think I could go on procrastinating forever.


hooked on anxiety
Name: Alice Goff
Date: //2002-04-02 18:48:14 :
Link to this Comment: 1684

Call me crazy, but I am addicted to anxiety. I love the rush, the feeling of imminent doom and destruction that comes from excessive procrastination, appearing in public places, and other panic inducing situations. Especially as regards to performance, I have learned to cope with anxiety by embracing it, and accepting its inevitable presence in my life. Sometimes I think that without it I would not be able to get things done, as Natalie Merrill pointed out in her last posting. Anxiety can be destructive in excess quantities, but it can also be an important drive to perform to the best of our abilities. Viva adrenaline!


anxiety
Name: molly finn
Date: //2002-04-02 20:41:23 :
Link to this Comment: 1687

my boyfriend and i get into fights about anxiety. I say anxiety is important, not even just the kind of adrenaline anxiety you get when you need ot save your life or something, but normal anxieties. It kind of makes me feel creative and makes me highly aware of my surroundings and and all the sensual details. my boyfiend says anxiety is horrible (of course, when i get a panic attack he is the one to have to deal with it). Listening to the talk made me realize that I probably do have a real problem with anxiety, and as much as it can make me feel sensitive and interested and manic, it can also really be bad for me.

I used to drive around when I was anxious, but now at school i don't have a car, soooo, I'm a lot more anxious. Cooking, too, helps, but I don't do that here either. I need to find new things to do that i can actually do here.


Anxiety
Name: Sara Press
Date: //2002-04-02 20:57:30 :
Link to this Comment: 1688

The discussion on Anxiety last week was very interesting. It is a common problem, especially at a place such as Bryn Mawr and should be discussed more frequently. Almost everybody here is at some point anxious, i would assume, you can especially feel it in the air as finals get closer or during weeks of a lot of midterms. We joke that the atmosphere changes, but you can tell just by looking around campus. Anxiety plays a big part in people's lives, and to be aware of your anxiety level is important.



Name: Jennifer P
Date: //2002-04-02 21:30:08 :
Link to this Comment: 1689

I thought the discussion on anxiety was very thorough. Professor Thomas and his wife complemented eachother exceptionally well. My only worry with this type of topic is people's immediate misconceptions. I felt as if many people would make a rush for a self-diagnosis. I do feel that the explanations made the differences between healthy and unhealthy anxiety obvious.


anxiety
Name: Rachel Wri
Date: //2002-04-03 07:58:21 :
Link to this Comment: 1696

I am a person who feels anxious on a regular basis but I think that the level of anxiety is either low or I have learned to manage it. That is, I have learned that this is what my own body feels like most of the time. I am almost always anxious about school, about what to do with my life (when I get a chance to think about it), about pleasing/not disappointing my parents and friends and then other things, some of them rational fears, also cause me anxiety from time to time. I try to manage this by spending time with friends, writing in a journal, taking a walk, or even napping as a way to sort of turn off my brain and restart it like a computer. While all of these help, I have to admit (and I think many other people are dealing with this problem) that some of the ways I deal with anxiety are no more healthy than the anxiety itself: eating candy while I am working, feeling guilty, etc. My job in the near future is not, I dont think to elimate anxiety from my life--it is practically a part of my personality!-- but to learn how to manage it in the most healthy way possible.


Anxiety
Name: Mariah Sch
Date: //2002-04-03 08:49:23 :
Link to this Comment: 1697

Hello! Anxiety played a dominant role for my second two years at Bryn Mawr. I would often have trouble sleeping and have an uneasy stomach because of stress over work. This year I learned to stop worrying about everything at once and especially to only worry about one task at a time. When I was very anxious I found that I accomplished alot because of fear but it was not worth the price of frayed nerves and an unhealthy life. Now I only get very anxious when it really counts like for finals.


Anxiety
Name: Adrienne L
Date: //2002-04-03 11:32:38 :
Link to this Comment: 1699

Anxiety and stress have definitely been a big part of my life, especially in the last year. There are so many different ways that it can manifest itself that sometimes it is possible not to notice quite how stressed out and anxious you really are. I think the important thing for me has been learning to recognize when I am feeling anxious or stressed, and learning to deal with it. I don't think there is a "cure" for stress - we are always going to undergo stress in one form or the other - it's just a matter of dealing with it in a healthy manner.


anxiety = thesis
Name: Krisitna E
Date: //2002-04-03 12:05:56 :
Link to this Comment: 1700

I been sufferig from a larger amount of anxiety this semester, but the reason is simple: thesis and outstanding gym credits do not add up to a calm state of mind.
In the outside world, I wonder how the World Trade Center survivors are dealing with their anxiety disorders? I am curious to see if they are being prescribed medications or if they are going to behavior modification psychotheraphy. Until this lecture series, I had not been aware that there even was the possiblility to learn to live with an anxiety disorder without a medicine.


Forum Question Exercise and Mental Health
Name: Amy Campbe
Date: //2002-04-03 20:10:22 :
Link to this Comment: 1702

Kate Fonshell spoke about the strong mind/body connection and the positive role of exercise. How do you define the 'what', 'when' and 'where' of inserting exercise in to your day - week? How has exercise/movement benefited your mental health?


Migraines
Name: Tasneem P.
Date: //2002-04-03 22:30:40 :
Link to this Comment: 1703

I think there is alot about migraines that we don't understand yet. My mom gets frequent migraines, but they are caused by any number of things ane under a number of different circumstances. It seems like some people are just unlucky...


Exercise and Mental Health
Name: Tasneem P.
Date: //2002-04-03 22:32:53 :
Link to this Comment: 1704

I really liked the comments today about how just 15 minutes a day can contribute to better mental health. For me, the obstacle to getting up and exercising is often the time it takes to get into workout clothes, not having the right shoes on, not being in a place "conducive" to exercise. I liked that Kate told us to get out of the "all or nothing" mentality.


Exercise and Mental Health
Name: Rabia
Date: //2002-04-03 22:49:54 :
Link to this Comment: 1705

I have tried to integrate an exercise program into my daily routine. By taking a long route to class, as was suggested in the meeting, as well as exercising in the morning when I get out of the bed. I have discovered that by incorporating a little exercise into the day as well as eating fruits (I prefer nectarines) and drinking water (which also beautifies the skin's complexion), I have dramatically begun to lead a more fulfilling lifestyle. I find that I need less sleep to function and that I no longer uselessly sleep either. At the same time, I have recognized that when my body says it's time to sleep, I sleep. The body and the mind must work in concert with each other in order for the person to function properly and in a healthy manner.


exercise and mental health
Name: Liz Bonovi
Date: //2002-04-03 22:54:15 :
Link to this Comment: 1706

Wow! I was so excited to hear Kate Fonshell. I remember watching her win the olympic trials in 1996 and it was really great to see her in person! I definitely think that exercise improves my mental health. I feel more awake and calm after exercise. Also, I do notice that it tends to control appetite. I try to schedule exercise in just like anything else in my day. Although sometimes when I'm feeling really sleep deprived I end up taking a nap instead. Most of the time, I do get my exercise in. One thing that helps me is to just do what I have time for and to try not to overface myself. If I do too much I stop enjoying it. For me, exercising is definitely part of a healthy lifestyle, I don't feel healthy if I'm not feeling reasonably fit.



Name: Hedya
Date: //2002-04-03 23:39:55 :
Link to this Comment: 1708

During high school, at some point, I randomly began weightlifting for myself. What I've noticed since then (and what Kate pointed out in her talk) was how much it served as a stress relief within itself. Whenever I have "pent up" feelings, I really feel like I can somehow let them out during that process and I feel a lot lighter afterwards. Also, her point about setting goals was something I've encountered as a successful progress method as well. It feels great to systematically reach higher and higher levels of discipline and exercise.



Name: ashley
Date: //2002-04-04 00:01:47 :
Link to this Comment: 1709

I generally have the same problems as others that have posted: I'm tired; the gym is far away; so much homework; not only factoring exercise time but time for getting ready, getting there, and getting showered and re-dressed afterwards. Plus, whenever I do things, I want immediate gratification, and exercise doesn't provide that. Kate Fonshell's talk made me realize that I don't have to make exercise such a chore, and I hope that I can take those words to heart. To do this, I need to pick something that I like to do, set a time to do it, and maybe just go out around campus - not necessarily the gym, which (to me) is just a reminder of how many other people ARE exercising, instead of a source of inspiration.


Exercise and Mental Health
Name: Monica Loc
Date: //2002-04-04 01:08:15 :
Link to this Comment: 1712

Kate Fonshell spoke about the strong mind/body connection and the positive role of exercise. How do you define the 'what', 'when'
and 'where' of inserting exercise in to your day - week? How has exercise/movement benefited your mental health?

I used to exercise three times a week before college but since I have so much work I do not have the time to go to the gym because it is so far away I have not really worked out. I actually miss working out because it makes me feel better and it relieves my daily stress. I ought to start exercising again because it is a great way to start or end my day. The only exercise I really get now is walking and it feels good too but I hope to start going back to the gym soon because I like being active.


exercise
Name: Shanti Mik
Date: //2002-04-04 11:22:37 :
Link to this Comment: 1718

I usually try to get the exercise done in the morning because I found that the later in the day that I did it, the easier it was to postpone because work would come up or I was just too tired to do it. I really enjoy playing sports so after a while I started joining club sports becaue I found that going to the gym in the morning soon became a chore. By integrating it into a fun activity I had a great time and it felt great. Exercise has definitley made me feel better physically and its a great feeling to know you can play a sport well or that you were responsible for how great you feel and look.


Contact info for Kate Fonshell
Name: Amy Campbe
Date: //2002-04-04 12:21:59 :
Link to this Comment: 1719

Kate Fonshell is available by e-mail to answer questions or continye the conversation about the benefits of exerecise. You may contact her at
kfon@msn.com


Execirse
Name: Marie Brow
Date: //2002-04-04 16:21:26 :
Link to this Comment: 1722

Last year I had a very definite workout scheduled into my day. I decided to go to the gym from 6:30-7:00 AM everyday. I know it sounds crazy to be getting up that early, but I found that that was the one time when I KNEW that NOTHING suddenly pop up to distract me. This year I am definitely stuck in the all or nothing routine, which has prevented me from being as active as I would like. I'm going to try exercising in little ways for small amounts of time in order to get back in the swing of things.


exercise
Name: Shanze
Date: //2002-04-04 16:39:56 :
Link to this Comment: 1723

I think exercise is very important in one's life because it keeps the mind and the body fit. I used to exercise every once in a while when I was in high school and it made me feel better and healthier. HOwever, i'm a very lazy person and find it an effort to exercise so I haven't been doing much lately...


Exercise
Name: Nicole Pie
Date: //2002-04-04 19:10:55 :
Link to this Comment: 1724

I normally exercise when I am stressed out or I have some extra time during my day to fit it in. Classes here aren't very condusive to having an exercise schedule, I feel when I'm not doing homework, going to classes, or eating, I am normally sleeping. When I am stressed out from classes and work, exercise allows me to have a break from everything and clear my mind.



Name: aeronwy
Date: //2002-04-04 20:28:18 :
Link to this Comment: 1725

i think the way you define exercise has everything to do with your perspective about physical activity in general. she said that it could make you less stressed out, and i'm sure that's true for some people, but i find that if i am really overwhelmed with work, then the thought of exercise does nothing to relieve that. instead, the idea of having yet another obligation is just too much. while i might feel a little better while actually working out, i usually regret it later when i am so busy and i think "i shouldn't have spent time on the [whatever] machine, i should have spent it writing my paper. my professor doesn't care an iota about my nice legs." and i'm sure people might criticize me, but that just proves my point - it all has to do with your perspective, whether you choose to see it as a waste or time or a distraction from more urgent and important matters.

i found it ironic that she suggested being creative as a way to get regulalry non-active people to exercise. it seems to me that these are the very people who are already the most creative in finding excuses about why they don't have a regular work out. we all know the perennial joke about the couch potato who breaks a sweat from the stress of flipping the remote. of course, this is an exaggerate caricature, but dieters and others make these types of creative rationalizations all the time. i hardly think a lack of imagination is the problem. it's attitude. sure, i could take a longer route around campus to get to a certain building, and the thought might even cross my mind before i start out, but when it comes down to it, i'm still going to go the shortest route as long as i think exercise is a waste of time. not that i don't want to be healthy and all that, but i felt like no one was really pointing out the obvious. i mean, everyone wants to be fit, but there's another reason why a lot of people aren't, and it has nothing to do with ignorance.


athletics and depression
Name: Kristina E
Date: //2002-04-04 21:35:29 :
Link to this Comment: 1726

I had heard about the connection between exercise and depression before, but I had underestimated the amount to which any exercise would be beneficial. It is interesting that any physical activity, including shopping, would fall under the category of exercise. I wonder if grouping such things like shopping as exercise, then people will rationalize away actual exercise.


Exercise
Name: Sherolyn O
Date: //2002-04-06 19:11:53 :
Link to this Comment: 1730

Even though Kate Fonshell suggested that we see exercise as a positive thing, I honestly find it hard to do so. The word 'exercise' reminds me of a chore, which I have to force myself to do. Luckily, I've found some fun ways to exercise. I really enjoy group activities, such as volleyball and bowling. I also enjoy video games such as DDR (Dance Dance Revolution) and a newer game called PUMP. These activities are so fun that I play them in my free time. I even bought DDR pads for my playstation and exercise in my dorm room. Exercise has helped me relieve my stress and feel lively and energetic. These feelings also affect my mental health and help me concentrate and feel alert while I study.


Exercise
Name: Barbara Ca
Date: //2002-04-07 12:36:19 :
Link to this Comment: 1734

Since last summer I've made exercise a regular part of my life again and it feels great. Not only is it wonderful to get into and stay in shape, working out always improves my mood and gets me energized to start my work. I was really surprised by some of the comments about exercise being a chore. Although it was difficult and a little frustrating at the beginning, working out is now one of the most enjoyable parts of my day. I think the trick, as discussed in the seminar, is sticking with it.


exercise
Name: Ana
Date: //2002-04-08 10:47:04 :
Link to this Comment: 1745

It was good to hear that exercise can simply consist of taking a longer route to class and does not have to be a rigorous routine. Although I don't have much time to go to the gym, I do try and do some kind of physical activity throughout the week.


Exercise
Name: Jennifer V
Date: //2002-04-08 12:18:49 :
Link to this Comment: 1746

Ever since high school, I have make a point of exercising for at least a few minutes every day. This exercise usually comes from walking to class: I walk quickly out of habit, and I try to leave myself enough time to take an indirect route. I started doing this for physical reasons, rather than mental ones: if I don't exercise, then I can't sleep, and staying relatively motionless for long periods of time greatly irritates my knees. However, I have also noticed mental benefits: I can concentrate longer when I exercise, and it helps reduce stress.


Excercise
Name: Irum Shehr
Date: //2002-04-08 13:56:35 :
Link to this Comment: 1747

I used to be one of those people who are ferverently anti-excercise. I would sit back and wwatch my friends sweat it out in soccer or cross-country and be convinced that I wanted none of it. This semester, I am taking jazz dance and have started swimming regularly. Almost against my will - I found that it not only made me feel better - but that thegreatest benefit that it provided me was that it allowed me to forget the rest of my life for an hour three time a week. Its really helped me find balance in a semester where there have been way too many pressures.


Exercise
Name: Nana Ama
Date: //2002-04-08 18:01:30 :
Link to this Comment: 1748

I was very a "anti-exercise" person. However I have made an effort to change that this semester. I try to go to the gym once in a while to work out. I can barely work out for five straight minutes so i take it bit by bit. Slowly and steadilty am building some "stamina" and going an extra three minutes every time i work out and It feels really good afterwards. However, I am still struggling to fit this into my schedule. It basically depends on how much work i have to do, my mood, etcetera. Hopefully, I would be able to work out on the regular basis at specific times by the end of the semester.


Working Out
Name: Sara Press
Date: //2002-04-08 19:33:27 :
Link to this Comment: 1750

She said some interesting things about physical exercise and simple things you can do to be more physically fit. She had some good points and made me realize that I do feel better when I am more active, and although it is hard to get down to the gym three times a week for 30-40 minutes, I can keep myself active in other ways.



Name: Jennifer P
Date: //2002-04-09 00:45:25 :
Link to this Comment: 1761

I am one of those people who once I am in the gym I don't want to leave. However it is the task of getting to the gym that keeps me from going as often as I would like to. I am convinced of the mental benefits of excercise. There is nothing better than running or going to the gym after a bad test. Even knowing the benefits though.. I wish there was some sort of shuttle to the gym!



Name: Elizabeth
Date: //2002-04-09 13:54:09 :
Link to this Comment: 1765

Exercise has been a woderful tool in maintaining my mental health. It is easiest for me to exercise in the summer since I bike to and from work. The ride is about 2.5-3 miles so it's a great workout. I have found this to be a very easy way to exercise since I can not skip it because that is how I get to work. During the school year, I like to be outside as much as possible and so walks into town are the usual way for me to exercise. Timing them is more of a challenge, but it usually works so that I take longer walks about four times a week.


Exercise and Mental Health
Name: Lelani
Date: //2002-04-09 16:31:34 :
Link to this Comment: 1766

Idealy, I would hope to be the exercise type. I think I really need it to destress and to gain a more positive body image. But I have enough trouble rolling out of bed before noon so I can't imagine exercise on a regular basis. I mean I always make plans, but when it comes right down to it, I always opt to sleep...But I aspire to being more active, most certainly.


Exercise
Name: Greta Tess
Date: //2002-04-09 20:22:49 :
Link to this Comment: 1768

I was particularly struck by her simple comment that the most beneficial exercise is one you like to do. I incorporate some form of exercising into every week and have tried many different things: aerobics, running, kick boxing, tennis, stairmaster, etc. and it wasn't until recently that I discovered how much I like swimming. I used to dread running but find that I actually look forward to swimming. It's much easier to come away from exercising feeling good if you didn't spend the whole time being mad that you were doing it (such as when I was running).


exercise and mental health
Name: Molly Finn
Date: //2002-04-09 21:02:48 :
Link to this Comment: 1769

The session was very confirming. Last semester I worked out everyday for up to an hour, which was a lot. This semester I'm lucky if I convince myself to go to the gym for twenty minutes once a week. But it still counts!!! I thought to get any benefit you needed to work out for at least an hour (darn middle school gym teachers!!?!?!). Having this new bit of information makes me feel like exercise is more do-able. Although I was less stressed last semester and do feel I can attribute part of that to the exercise. Basically the answer is: we should have less homework!!!


The Rut
Name: Alice
Date: //2002-04-09 22:59:02 :
Link to this Comment: 1770

Sometimes I feel like a wheelbarrow stuck in a rut-- as a student I have learned to function in very set routines and schedules which seldom change. I go to class at the same time every week, I eat at the same time, I even eat the same things on specific days of the week. Not only is this boring, but it is also limiting and constrained. Whenever I exercise though, of my own volition, that brings an element of spontaneity into my life. It is a period of unstructured activity that is healthy as well as liberating.


Exercise and Mental Health
Name: Sarah G. K
Date: //2002-04-10 00:16:44 :
Link to this Comment: 1771

I used to exercise quite regularly my freshman year, but over the years it has gotten very difficult to squeeze in a trip to the gym. My classes are practically right out of the back door of my door, so I dont find myself doing many cross-campus treks either. Exercising definitely gives me an alert sense of what my body is feeling. Even if I am sore from exercise, I feel accomplishment and satisfaction of having worked out. Music is a huge factor for me when I exercise. I love having great beats and tunes to listen to, and it significantly shortens the time of activity, particularly something repetitive like jogging. I am sure that listening to music and exercising are both activities that are good for your mental health. Not only does it give your mind to relax, but it also reminds me that I can enjoy myself even when I'm doing something that's not "fun" (exercise isn't fun to me!).


fitting exercise in
Name:
Date: //2002-04-10 01:29:47 :
Link to this Comment: 1773

I admit that this is one of my biggest challenges. For one thing, I am a person who never excelled at sports... last one picked for teams and all that kind of stuff... and so I have often viewed exercise as an embarrising chore. I liked what Kate said about being able to split exercise up so that you do some if not all the exercise recommended. However, this semester I'm making a conscious effort to incorporate more "traditional" exercise into my weekly schedule. On the mornings when I have a later class, I get up at the same time that I would to go to my early class and try to do an aerobics or pilates workout in my room. I've found that for now I am much more comfortable working out alone than with a buddy--that's what works for me right now and maybe when I feel a little more physically fit, I'll enjoy a buddy more, but fitting this in is my first step.


the last posting
Name: Rachel Wri
Date: //2002-04-10 01:30:43 :
Link to this Comment: 1774

Sorry, I am an idiot. The previous anonymous posting was from me.


exercise
Name: emiko sait
Date: //2002-04-10 10:04:25 :
Link to this Comment: 1775

I think its difficult, especially in an environment like Bryn Mawr, to do things for one's self. Kate had mentioned that exercise and the scheduling of it is a form of selfcare. I thought that was an intersting point. Often I don't have the time for "things for myself" while I am in school. I have numerous obligations pulling me in multiple directions, scheduling time to bathe and eat is often difficult. In this way, exercise is an impossibility. I have tried instituting a scheduled program of exercise at the beginning of a number of semesters, yet by the point of midterms, these programs are usually abandoned for sleep. Ideally, I would like to have time to exercise - to make time to exercise, but often it seems like more of a luxury than a reality.


Response
Name: Alia Prest
Date: //2002-04-10 10:20:52 :
Link to this Comment: 1776

I think that Bryn Mawr is one of the hardest places to intergrate excerise and physical health into our everyday lives because of our stress factors and because quite a few things are out of our control. I have found it difficult to integrate exercise into my everday life, but I like the fact that, as said above in the postings, that Kate pointed out that the "all or none" mentality is not one that we have to have about exercise.


exercise
Name: Natalie
Date: //2002-04-10 10:41:19 :
Link to this Comment: 1777

I have just recently started an exercise program and found it to be very beneficial and everything that was discussed last Wednesday. It helped me adjust to a normal sleep schedule, I can concentrate better, I am able to maintain a constant level of energy and am acctually less hungry. The benefits far outweigh my general laziness and the extra nap I could get in instead of going to the gym. It is a good way to relieve tension and work towards a goal.



Name: Mariah Sch
Date: //2002-04-10 10:44:15 :
Link to this Comment: 1778

I find that one of the most relaxing things is taking walks around Bryn Mawr campus in the evening. I do this a couple of times a week because it is one of the ways that I can really reduce stress and force my mind off of work. I also swim a lot during the summer.


exercise
Name: Lois McAff
Date: //2002-04-10 11:18:29 :
Link to this Comment: 1779

I fit exercise into my daily life, because the rest of the day goes much better when I include exercise. I am more productive, healthy and happy.
I feel that I accomplish more when I am not stressed.



Name: Celestina
Date: //2002-04-10 11:25:41 :
Link to this Comment: 1780

In my life, exercise has played an important role in creating less stress in my life. The first time I had a bad break-up with an ex-boyfriend, I began going to the gym at my high school every afternoon. The reason was to get my mind off of things. Boy did it work. I was hooked from then on. I would work out two hours every day, except on weekends, after school. I had loved playing sports, volleyball, basketball and cheerleading before but had given them up to do other things such as theater and debate. I realized that playing sports and being physically active had balanced me out in a way that I missed my last two years in high school. Since coming to college though I find it harder to find the free time (but do so when I can). In addition, I hate the gym here at the school...there is little to no equipment that I enjoy using. As a result I do as much as I can in my room and then go outside to get physical exercise.
Physical exercise, in my opinion, does a lot to combat depression and stress. :)


Forum Question for Week 4 Depression/Mood
Name: Amy Campbe
Date: //2002-04-10 17:22:41 :
Link to this Comment: 1781

From your experience, how does the range of ones moods effect ones performance -one's ability to live, work and play in a community and what are things that you do to change moods when it is necessary?


Mood
Name: Hedya
Date: //2002-04-10 20:39:00 :
Link to this Comment: 1782

For this question, most of my experiences tie again into issues of anxiety, since I have found that to be what impacts my moods the most. In less specific cases, however, I find that being outside/in a light-filled environment puts me in a better mood. There are also times when being around so many people throughout the day can be overwhelming, at which point I can either retreat to my room or to "private" spaces on campus. I find that I deal best with being in a bad mood of whatever sort after I have time to myself to sort things out. Then I can usually resume normal interactions with others.


exercise
Name: Kate Lenah
Date: //2002-04-10 23:03:20 :
Link to this Comment: 1784

Exercise has greatly helped my mental health by providing moments of study-free time. Also, I have generally tried to schedule exercise around large blocks of free time when I know I will have the time, but Kate's talk made me realize that I could also fit it in even if I had very little time to spare. I've also found exercise to be easier when it is outside in nice weather.


Depression/Mood
Name: Liz Bonovi
Date: //2002-04-10 23:06:07 :
Link to this Comment: 1785

I would definitely say that mood can make a huge difference in people's lives. When I'm in a bad mood, I definitely do not enjoy spending time with people as much as I usually do. I find that for me, I am better able to work and enjoy myself when I'm in a normal/good mood (which, luckily for me is most of the time!). When I'm in a bad mood, I love to sleep or exercise depending on how tired I am. That usually fixes me right up!


Depression
Name: Monica Loc
Date: //2002-04-11 00:04:32 :
Link to this Comment: 1788

From your experience, how does the range of ones moods effect ones performance -one's ability to live, work and play in a community and what
are things that you do to change moods when it is necessary?

I definitely have my moods! When I am in a good mood, I am inspired to do better in work or in activities. When I am in a bad mood, I could care less about anything happening around me and I just dont want to talk to anybody. I am generally a happy person and when I am depressed people usually ask me why but I dont like talking about it. I try not to let my bad mood get the best of me so I go out and just walk, have a nice drink or I talk to my boyfriend and best friend and after that everything is better!


Moods
Name: Sherolyn O
Date: //2002-04-11 00:11:03 :
Link to this Comment: 1789

Bad moods and frequent fluctuations in my mood negatively affect my performance in a community. When I'm having a bad day, it's harder for me to focus on my work, be productive, and socialize with others. I just want to hide in my room and be alone. When I'm in a good mood and my moods are stable and constant, it's easier and much more enjoyable to be active in the Bryn Mawr community. Spending time alone and listening to music are things I do to change moods.


Moods
Name: Rabia
Date: //2002-04-11 13:37:32 :
Link to this Comment: 1793

I thought that the most enlightening thing I heard yesterday was a comment by Professor Grobstein about the way the brain itself regulates moods and behaviors. It was fascinating! I have never heard it explained to me that we are up and down fairly regularly in order to make sense or understand the world around us--which is also up and down fairly regularly. Again, it was quite remarkable to see how our brains function. We are truly blessed to have the ability to think and discern and function on a day-to-day basis. As far as my moods are concerned, I am a deeply observant Muslim and I hope that my actions are a testament to that. As a Muslim, my daily prayers as well as my unrelenting faith in the One God keep me upbeat and optimistic. If however, since I am human, I do get a bit down, I find comfort in hearing the recitation of the Qur'an (Muslim holy book) or simply by taking a walk and enjoying the beautiful world around us. We all experience mood changes and indeed, for me, these changes only testify to the fact that we are a product of our environments and that, as the Professor was saying, perhaps our environments may need reform, not necessarily we ourselves.


Mood/Depression
Name: Lelani
Date: //2002-04-11 18:04:43 :
Link to this Comment: 1794

I think that I have major mood swings every now and then. I don't really try and change them, but rather try to just let it be. Like if I'm having a bad day, I chalk that up under "Bad Day" rather than trying to force myself to be happy. Sometimes, you just have to allow yourself the discomfort/luxury of being miserable.

But I really think that the quote from the *Unquiet Mind* made more sense then I could ever hope to make.

"I honestly believe that as a result of it I have felt more things, more deeply; had more experiences, more intensely; loved more, and have been more loved; laughed more often for having cried more often; appreciated more the springs, for all the winters... Depressed, I have crawled on my hands and knees in order to get across a room and have done it for month after month. But normal or manic I have run faster, thought faster, and loved faster than most I know."
Kay Redfield Jamison, An Unquiet Mind


Mood Talk
Name: Nicole Pie
Date: //2002-04-11 18:29:14 :
Link to this Comment: 1795

When I am in a good mood, I find that I work better. However, if I am in a bad mood I find that all I want to do is either sleep, watch tv or read a book and I cannot always do that when I have work to do. When I am in a bad mood and it is necessary to do work I usually put on upbeat music and it helps to make me feel better.


Mood
Name: Ana
Date: //2002-04-12 10:19:12 :
Link to this Comment: 1796

I have found that moods are simply a matter of perspective. If I'm not feeling that great, I try to alter my perspective and see things more positively - or at least more objectively.


moods
Name: ashley
Date: //2002-04-12 13:46:28 :
Link to this Comment: 1797

When I am in a really poor mood, I can't do my work, I keep to myself, and I pretty much just hibernate in my room. When I am just in a generally bad mood, I will still go out with my friends, but my temper is shortened, I don't participate in conversations, and I kinda space out. When I'm in a good mood, I'm all ready to go out, have fun, and laugh all the time. Now if my friends and I could just get all our moods together on the same day, that would be nicer... I guess I don't really work to "change" my mood. You have to be wanting to change it, and when I'm in a really poor mood, it's just easier to retreat into that and do nothing; there seems to be something comfortable about it. I find that going out with my friends does seem to lighten my mood - someone always says something funny or stupid, and then I have to laugh.


depression
Name: Kristina D
Date: //2002-04-12 15:57:00 :
Link to this Comment: 1798

I find that when I am in a bad mood or depressed, I tend to do my work faster. Although, if I'm anxious then I can't do any work at all. I thought this week's presentation was very interesting because of the multimedia aspects. Professor Grobstein presented depression in a different way than I expected. I had anticipated that we would hear a lecture about linical depression, so it was a refreshing change.


Exercise and Health
Name: Meghan Lam
Date: //2002-04-12 16:51:39 :
Link to this Comment: 1799

I know that exercise is a wonderful part of everyday life, which can be incorporated in many different ways. I think that exercise can be anything: from walking long distances (like walking downtown and back) to doing a defined physical activity, like playing a sport, doing an exercise tape, etc. Since life is so busy, however, I try to do little things. Sometimes I take the stairs instead of the elevator, stretch after getting up, and try to maintain a "non-sedentary" mindset. This leads to an awareness of the body, which means, I think, that I can "exercise" anytime of the day, no matter where I am, in order to clear my head, or to concentrate better on what I am doing. And I've found that this increased consciousness has helped me to feel a bit more energetic about life in general.


Depression
Name: Meghan
Date: //2002-04-12 16:59:43 :
Link to this Comment: 1800

I enjoyed the manner in which Prof. Grobstein presented "depression," in the sense that he made a distinction between the medical model and the bio-neurological model of "mood variation." I would have liked to have seen a little more "clinical" depression explained, however, especially in conjunction with the Headache Seminar presented by Dr.Kerson at the beginning of the semester, and the Anxiety talk given a couple of weeks ago. That said, depression is a very big part of our society, and I think it is something that hits just about everyone at one time or another. When I am depressed, while it's never severe, I definitely feel incapable of doing anything.


mood disorders
Name: Shanze
Date: //2002-04-12 22:14:12 :
Link to this Comment: 1801

From my experience, I think ones mood plays a very important role in ones performance. If I'm in a bad mood, I don't like to work, i don't like talking to or seeing people as they get on my nerve, and I basically think very negatively of life. On the other hand, the reverse is true when i'm in a good mood. To change my mood, I just need to get away from people and things and be alone for awhile or just sleep. Then, hopefully I get into a better mood.


mood
Name: Shanti Mik
Date: //2002-04-13 14:39:15 :
Link to this Comment: 1802

Mood can definitley affect my ability to work. If I'm in a bad mood or feeling down then the work seems pointless and it's really hard to force yourself to do anything. When I'm in a good mood, it seems that everything is fun and enjoyable. My mood can determine that manner in which I approach any task. The happier I am, the better is my performance. When I'm in a bad mood, I find that I spend a lot of time focousing on it and thinking about it and in order to change my mood, I need to remove myself from my thoughts and do something. I usually exercise or spend time with my friends and I find that that helps get over my bad mood.



Name: Elizabeth
Date: //2002-04-13 15:16:42 :
Link to this Comment: 1804

For me, my range of mood tends to dictate how porductive I am. For example, if I'm in a great mood, I'm more likely to tackle a paper that seems impossible to write. However, if it's "just one of those days" and I don't feel particualtrily great, it's much more of a challenge to write a paper or do something that I'm not looking forward to. It helps greatly to surround myself with friends and my running shoes. The combination of knowing that there are friends there to run to usually does the trick because they tend to be feeling many of the same things I am. If all else fails, I good run helps fix everything since I'm physcially tired to protest doing the work and my mood gets much better.


Depression/Moods
Name: Nana Ama
Date: //2002-04-14 00:35:16 :
Link to this Comment: 1805

First of all, I think the lecture was excellent even though it did not follow the trend I expected it to follow. In think it is very healthy for depressed people to think of depression as a "variation" and not an illness. This would help them live and deal with it better which could, in effect, reduce the effect it could have on their performance.
Moods definately affect ones performance and even reduces ones zest for life. When am in a very bad mood (usually for as long as a week), I usually give my self a break. I take time off, leave campus (for instance I go to swart to walk around or to do some work in a different environment), do something different,like go to the movies, go to philly etc. That helps a little bit ... but at least it make a difference.


mental health
Name: Jennings
Date: //2002-04-14 13:53:30 :
Link to this Comment: 1807

I was very excited by the lecture on wendesday. So many of the topics covered were applicable to my life. I am so happy I'm taking this course. It has provided so many useful lectures that relate to my lifestyle.



Name: aeronwy
Date: //2002-04-15 01:32:17 :
Link to this Comment: 1810

i think this is a very cyclical thing... how you feel affects your performance, and (this is certainly true of hard-driving bryn mawr students) your performance affects your mood. when someone is nice to you, especially unexpectedly, than you feel better and you are probably then nicer to the next people you meet - the whole random acts of kindness idea. when i need a kick in the pants, i just put on my favorite music and sing to it. i might call my best friend or i might go to sleep. if i'm at home and it's during winter break and i usually don't have a lot to do, i'll re-read my favorite book. sometimes i watch frasier reruns and munch snacks, always a fun time. basically, i indulge in things that are sensually reasurring, and the comfort associated with these actions is usually strong enough to overwhelm a bad mood.

sometimes i need to make myself angry when i'm not - usually when i have to channel that emotion for some kind of writing, like an application for a non-profit agency or writing a paper in which i've been asked to take a role. in that case i think long and hard about the supposed injustice i'm supposed to be ranting about, and really dwell on it. eventually i can usually work myself into enough of a passion that the work gets done.



Name: Jennifer P
Date: //2002-04-15 12:27:29 :
Link to this Comment: 1811

There is no doubt how powerful someone's mood can be. I think one of the most important things one can learn is how to curb those feelings. You have to be able to take yourself aside and take a break...breath.. do something. I sometimes just have to leave the situation. Sometimes that means leaving the room, blasting music, leaving the library. After a certain point or rather a certain mood, people turn off and allow the mood they are in to be destructive. ITs hard not to. I'm convinced that its a talent.


moods
Name: Sarah G. K
Date: //2002-04-15 18:02:53 :
Link to this Comment: 1815

I once heard somewhere that you can choose to be in a good mood, and for the most part I believe it to be true (at least for me). There are going to be lots of things that have the potential to put you in a bad mood, and of course once something does, everything after that becomes more fodder for a bad mood/depression/etc. I am thankful that I do not have to struggle with genetic or biochemical effects of depression and mood alternation because even with the things that I do have to deal with, it's really difficult to do so. I think it's true that you know yourself better than anyone, and you know your moods too. It's a matter of being in tune with them, not denying them, but finding a way to overcome it.


Exercise
Name: Nitya Thom
Date: //2002-04-15 19:23:45 :
Link to this Comment: 1817

I try to integrate exercise into my day atleast 5 times a week. I normally try to work out for atleast 1 hour at a stretch and if I do not have a block of one hour free, I generally will not exercise at all instead of just doing a little. I liked Kate's comment - "All or nothing". I've been trying to incorporate even small amounts of my exercise into my day from then on and it really has made a difference. Even a little bit of exercise seems to invigorate me and improve my day greatly. I find I have alot more enery throughout the day and feel alot less lethargic on the days that I exercise.


depression, etc
Name: Molly Finn
Date: //2002-04-16 15:48:20 :
Link to this Comment: 1843

I think our society needs to rethink the way we perceive depression and mood. I think it's okay sometimes for people to be so sad that they can't do their "normal" jobs or responsibilties. I feel it's a normal part of life and i think everyone should be able to take time when they need it to NOT do school or work. Obviously there's a point when depression becomes destructive. I do get depressed, but it's usually a seasonal thing, so I always know I'll feel better at sometime. My depression is like a yearly Hamlet crisis, my opportunity to think way too much about everything. It clears me out and I feel so much better afterward. But dealing with depression AND school is a problem.

I really enjoyed Paul's presentation very much. Thank you.

P.S. I now have even MORE to argue about with my boyfriend


mood
Name: Mariah Sch
Date: //2002-04-16 16:03:05 :
Link to this Comment: 1844

From your experience, how does the range of ones moods effect ones performance -one's ability to live, work and play in a community and what are things that you do to change moods when it is necessary?
I find that mood can be a positive influence on functionality and a negative influence. When I am in a good mood, I tend to be more focused and energetic and can get more work done. When I am in a bad mood, I can be more appathetic and less interested in completeing work which, of course, can create problems. I find that if I am in a rut and can't accomplish anything, hanging out with friends or my boyfriend helps elevate my mood so that I can go back and get things done.


Moods
Name: Jennifer V
Date: //2002-04-16 18:45:36 :
Link to this Comment: 1847

As many people have already said, it is more difficult to function in a social situation when one is in a bad mood, and one feels less motivated to do anything. For my part, I don't tend to get severely depressed, but if I do find myself in a bad mood, I generally take some time to think about the cause, if there is one. If I can do something to fix the problem, fine, but if I can't, then I try to accept that I'm feeling poorly for the moment, and decide not to let it affect my work.


Response
Name: Alia Prest
Date: //2002-04-16 18:49:41 :
Link to this Comment: 1848

Moods definatly have an effect on a person's daily life in my experience. If I'm having a really bad day, it's harder to complete the simplests of tasks just due to lack of motivation. On the other hand, if I'm having a really great day, I can get a lot of things done because I am more motivated to so. One of the hardest things is adjusting to your moods and sometimes adjusting you behavior and outlook to deal with situations or people that you don't want to.

When I need to change my mood, I either watch a movie, take a drive and listen to some music or read a book that isn't required for a class. Anything that I find relaxing will most likely change my mood.


Depression
Name: Diana La F
Date: //2002-04-16 22:23:49 :
Link to this Comment: 1851

In my life I have come into contact with depression in many ways. I have had friends and family suffer from minor ailments to serious conditions, and each time was unique and extremely difficult for me to help them through. I have found that depression isn't something that you can turn on or off, it is something that exists with you for all your life. I have seen moods switch at the drop of a hat, I have seen a manic depressive, now known as a bi-polar, go from outrageously happy to suicidal in an hour. I have been with friends as they have had their stomach's pumped after they have tried to O.D. I have talked and cried with friends when all they want to do is end thier life, they could not find anything to live for. I have helped people deal with parents after they have cut themselves, burned themselves, and done other forms of self-mutilation. I have learned that these moods do not just interfere with your life, they RUN your life. These thoughts are with you constantly, and no matter how you try to mask them, you can't hide them from yourself forever. But I have also learned that these thoughts and actions make up some of the kindest, sweetest, most wonderful people in existence. So, do moods affect our lives? Moods ARE our lives, they make up who we are and how we act and deal with things. Depression should never get in the way of you being happy, and no matter what the cause of it is there is help. It just takes a while for a person to realize that, and until they do it is these moods that govern who they are.


Rejecting the classification of mood
Name: Alice Goff
Date: //2002-04-17 00:46:35 :
Link to this Comment: 1855

Moods are a constant part of being alive and I understand that. I would, however, like to take issue with the common classification of mood, dividing them into "good moods" and "bad moods". I don't think that these constructs of mood-quality are either correct or effective. By assigning sadness, for example, as a bad mood represents to me a cultural judgement on what it is to be sad. Obviously here, sadness is seen as a negative thing, a state to be avoided or eliminated. Turn that frown upside-down. I think great progress could be attained if we were to stop passing judgement on mood as either good or bad, and instead just except the emotial variations that are a constant and natural part of daily life. Perhaps a great deal of the anguish and misery that comes from being in a "bad mood" comes not from this mood itself, but from the stigma our society holds against being in a "bad mood". If we could accept mood, perhaps it would not cause us so much grief.


moods
Name: Rachel Wri
Date: //2002-04-17 09:35:15 :
Link to this Comment: 1858

Do moods effect my day to day life? Of course, when I am in a good mood I want to be around people and they want to be around me but, having lived with family members who suffered severe depression (and having had minor bouts myself) depression is much more than a mood. Mood makes it seem like something temporary, something you can shrug off, but people who suffer from depression cannot just strug it off. Day after day you wake up feeling terrible no matter what the circumstance and of course that effects a person even more. During the summer after my sophomore year, I was very depressed but had not found the words to tell someone. My usually neat room was a total wreck and I was mean to my family and friends all the time. I had temporary lost my regular personality and finally one day my mom asked, "Are you unhappy or something?" kind of casually and I yelled "Yes!" What a release. Until I could recognize the problem, there was no way that I could understand my own changing behavior and that made me even more depressed. This quick question helped me begin to break out of a cycle.


Depression
Name: Greta Tess
Date: //2002-04-17 10:07:02 :
Link to this Comment: 1859

When my mood changes I definitely notice the change in my performance. It's a normal part of being human that you experience mood changes that affect your performance because you would suffer if you were constantly excited and happy (your body can't be aroused all the time) and the same is true if you are in a slower sad mood (body is at a resting state). Luckily MOODS are inherently temporary and it is ok to experience a variety of them. It is only when this "sadness and inactivity" hits an all time low and persists for weeks or months, making you unable to do things you used to enjoy and withdraw from friends and family, that it may be considered depression and help should be sought. Otherwise, a varity of things can affect mood: sleep, good/bad grade on a test, weather, food, exercise, etc.


moods
Name: Natalie
Date: //2002-04-17 10:18:38 :
Link to this Comment: 1861

I have to agree with Alice. Sometimes, bad moods aren't so bad at all. They help you identify exactly what frusterates you and annoys you so that when you're in a good mood you can avoid those things. It also is a good relationship tester. If you've been in a pretty bad mood for awhile and your friends still hang out with you, you've got some pretty good friends. Good moods are desirable too of course for more reasons I guess than wanting to be in a bad mood. But if we don't experience the lows then the highs will never seem as sweet.


Moods/Depression
Name: Celestina
Date: //2002-04-17 10:22:34 :
Link to this Comment: 1862

A person's mood dramatically changes the type of life a person leads. Moods like depression can physically and mentally harm a person to the extent which they find carrying the simplest tasks, getting mail, taking a shower, or talking on the phone unbearable. If moods did not affect people in their daily lives we wouldn't have fields of psychology and psychiatry in the medical practice. What do I do to change my mood? Play music, talk on the phone with close personal friends and family, and remind myself that I make my mood...my mood should not be making me :)


Moods/Depression
Name: emiko sait
Date: //2002-04-17 11:12:02 :
Link to this Comment: 1864

In some ways I feel the same about moods as I do about anxiety. I feel that it is necessary, if one were in a single mood all of the time, one would not be able to gauge the significance of a certain situation or event. It is all comparative. In most cases, I think that the mind has a way of coping with situations and problems, in reaction, one has different moods that are mostly appropriate and necessary in order to function. As Professor Grobstein said, there is a range of moods. A problem occurs at the extreme ends of this range, for instance in bi-polar disorder - mania to depression. These cases significantly impair one's ability to 'live, work and play.' As I said, to me, moods are a necessary and natural process, I don't try to change my mood, I think that it would be against whatever nature that is behind it for me. If anything, I try to isolate the factors in my mood change and try to adress those issues. Moods are only a marker for factors which influence your life.


Moods
Name: Nitya Thom
Date: //2002-04-17 11:16:33 :
Link to this Comment: 1865

Moods are definitely a huge factor in my performance in all kinds of activities. When I'm in a bad mood I find it much harder to concentrate on what I'm doing and in general my energy levels will be down as well. I have found exercise a really good way to clear out my head and get rid of any kind of bad moods.


Moods
Name: Irum Shehr
Date: //2002-04-17 11:47:04 :
Link to this Comment: 1867

For me, moods can be a substantial barrier to getting work done. I usually pride myself on being a strong willed person who can tell herself to "just get on with it" and do whatever is necessary despite my bad moods. However, as I have progressed at college, its become more and more difficult to have the control over how I am feeling than I am used to. I can think back to freshman year when getting things done was not a matter of how I felt, but rather that they had to get done. Now, I find it much more difficult to put aside how I am feeling in order to get something done. Maybe the reason is that I have a lot more to think about as a senior, or that life just got more complicated along the way. I also think stress has a lot to do with it.... I find that its harder to snap out of a bad mood (which there may be no particular reason for) when I am stressed. I try to often take some time by myself, or take a short nap to improve my mood.


Forum Question Women and Addiction"
Name: Amy Campbe
Date: //2002-04-18 09:49:08 :
Link to this Comment: 1878

Talking about addiction and addictive behavior is difficult. A behavior that may become addictive for one person may not for another. Certain behaviors, smoking, drug use and excessive use of alcohol are all proven to have major health (and societal) consequences, yet the ability to change behavior around those substances is extremely difficult. How should we begin to talk about addiction in a way that is meaningful and helps women of all ages to better understand the line between being powerless over a behavior that has significant negative consequences and behaviors in moderation, that are a healthy part of our lives. How do we begin to identify when ?the line has been crossed?? All that we do in our lives, eat, sleep, work, study, play, etc. can be taken to extremes and have a negative impact on our health and well-being. How should we begin to think about our lives and our habits to increase our well-being?


addiction
Name: Lois
Date: //2002-04-18 13:05:25 :
Link to this Comment: 1881

I think one of the important things is to try to maintain an honesty with yourself about what you are doing and why. Addiction has such a strong connotation of shame with it in our society, as though we are bad people for not controlling ourselves if we are addicted, which is of course ludicrious, that's why they're called addictive substances.; So sometimes rather than face the shame we often will move into denial, or joking acceptance. I think it's important to have someone you trust and can be open with to talk about what is or is not going on in your life. If you find yourself thinking "I am drinking too much" chances are you probably are. Talk to someone, get some outside feedback, don't hold it in and don't be ashamed. Addiction is progressive - there are lots of theories as to why, and to me, it really doesn't matter. The fact remains that is is progressive and can have serious life-threatening potential harm. But it is important to maintain an openeness and honesty, with yourself and others. Stay connected with yourself, and you will know if you are using substances in a healthy way or not.. Look at and really listen to yourself, and if you have doubts, ask others, and don't be afraid of the answers.
Just stay connected ---which is one of the problems with addictive substances, they help you disconnect, sometimes from the truth as well as the stress.


Addiction
Name: Lelani
Date: //2002-04-18 16:20:13 :
Link to this Comment: 1883

I don't understand "in moderation" because personally I can see myself losing control. I'm afraid that if I even try things "in moderation" it will get the best of me. I often tell people I have an "addictive personality" and that's why I don't go out of my way to try things that I feel I won't be able to handle in the long run. But are people who have emotional problems the only ones at risk? I can't understand how some people can be in control and others can't. I feel like it's a myth, to be honest. I mean, doesn't everyone have an "addictive personality" to some extent?

But I guess I'm pretty cynical as all my life I have been surrounded by friends and loved ones who have gotten hooked on things but still insist that they are in control. Like my mom, my little brother and my older sister all drink and smoke--mostly to deal with stress or any problems they encounter. They all started out pretty young too (13, 15, 14 respectively). I am the middle child and I didn't know quite how to deal with it because all of a sudden I was the wet blanket. It's crazy though because even after some 25 odd years of smoking my mom still thinks she can quit whenever. The denial in my family is ridiculous. Plus I know that a lot the time, drugs and alcohol are an escape for my family. We all have such serious problems that we just gloss over. I try to be as honest as possible with them but all too often I just turn hostile.

So I feel like the unofficial narc. of my family--I'm always wagging my finger disapprovingly at them. But I feel someone has too. Otherwise we'd all be so out of touch with reality. Like my mom would still insist that she could quit smoking by substituting her cigarettes with cherry licorice.


Addiction
Name: Marie Brow
Date: //2002-04-18 20:58:23 :
Link to this Comment: 1885

I agree that it is difficult to define addiction and when we have crossed a line. I have stayed away from most addictive substances because I am addicted to control. I don't want to ever be out of control, either in the short term (one carefree night drinking, in which I might be "out of (what I strictly define as) control") or in the long term (possibly becoming addicted to a substance). I wish we had talked about being "addicted" to relationships, which was something the speaker briefly mentioned. As women, I think we are more prone to only feel complete and happy when we have someone loving and providing for us. This probably results from a lower sense of self esteem that many women battle with. Additionally, girls are generally more pampered than boys while growing up. Once that nuturing and protective figure is gone, who do we turn to? I know that relationships are something that I actively seek, even if they are not the most healthy. In order to "break the cycle" I am following many of the same steps of someone who is addicticted to a substance, or behavior: I am going cold turkey, remaining single until I have truly learned that I can be happy on my own.


addiction
Name: Hedya
Date: //2002-04-18 21:34:29 :
Link to this Comment: 1886

In agreement with previous comments, I think addiction is more or less an individual thing, based on all kinds of different levels of control, will-power, definitions of "moderation," etc. It can't really be standardized. But an effective way in helping women with the problem of addictions in general would be to teach each person to define and understand each of these concepts for herself. I guess this would help anyone, regardless of sex. But, for those who definitely have developed a level of addictive behavior, I think a key element in the path to recovering from it is not only wanting that change for one's self, but also setting realistic goals (which again, would be based on the individual. For some, going "cold turkey" would be impossible, while for others it's the way to go).


Addiction
Name: Sherolyn O
Date: //2002-04-19 00:12:26 :
Link to this Comment: 1888

I agree with Lois' comments and believe that people should be honest with themselves. By analyzing yourself and realizing whether you have an addictive personality, you can set personalized boundaries for yourself. For people who lack self-control, it may be best to abstain from any addictive substances and behaviors (i.e. drugs, gambling). For others, it may be good to clearly define moderation and abide by the rules that you've established. If you have an extremely addictive personality, it may be necessary to have your friends and family be aware of your addictions and help you overcome them. Basically, I think a self-analysis and the ability to be honest with oneself will help us to identify what the line is and when it has been crossed.


Additctions
Name: Irum Shehr
Date: //2002-04-19 12:23:26 :
Link to this Comment: 1890

For me maintaining the line between having "a few drinks" and being addicted to it is something that I have worked out for myself. Having been strongly anti-smoking since I was a child (and constantly nagging my father to not smoke - he quite 12 years ago), I was never attracted to smoking. It always seemed quite replusive to me. However, coming from a family where neither of my parents drink (my father has the very very occaisional whisky), finding my limits in that aspect has been more of a challenge. I admit that I have been quite thoroughly drunk a few times - and that made me realise that I really did not like the feeling and the loss of control that was inherant with it. I am not someone who likes to be in that sort of situation. Thus, I am now content to have a few drinks whenever I go out to a bar or something with my friends. I think if I started craving alcohol I would be worried - I have never felt like I NEED a drink to get through something. That is the key, I think. There are times that people think that they are in control, but they really must be honest with themselves about WHY they are doing/taking something. There is a lot of blame shifting that goes on in our society, and there is a tendency to blame everything and everyone other than ourselves for our problems and to not take accountability for our decisions. This is something we must be critical of - know what you are doing, why you are doing it.`



Name: aeronwy
Date: //2002-04-20 02:12:23 :
Link to this Comment: 1891

well, it's hard to figure out what you can say that hasn't already been said. yes, of course, it's an individual thing and people should be honest with themselves, but that doesn't mean they will or can be. like the examples that were given, sometimes the person can be quite intellectual and high-functioning and they don't suspect what's happening. you would think that former meth addict she described would know better, wouldn't you? the incentive is huge for people to deny and rationalize, as pointed out, and she stressed that people do this even when they know better. this is the problem i've run into with friends - you can talk, but they won't hear if they don't want to listen. although it wasn't with her suggestion in mind, my situation worked out the same way in the end, and i no longer associate with people i know to be drug users.

drug addiction for myself has never been an issue, just because i loathe smoking more than anything else (except possibly roaches) and i get sick from drinking (asian sunburn) before i've even had enough to get a nice buzz from it. plus, drugs are expensive and i'd rather save my money to go shopping. not to mention the calories of alcohol - i worked too hard on my weight-lifting, thanks very much.

so addiction is never something i've ever needed to have a conversation about, personally. i think if i ever encountered that situation my response would be tough love. i've learned that it's not worth it to try to force something to happen if it won't - i value myself too much to waste my time and energy on someone who doesn't value their own life or body as much. conversation is fine to start, but i don't see myself relating to a drug user in the long term if they don't want to make an effort to break the habit.


Addiction
Name: Diana La F
Date: //2002-04-20 11:02:00 :
Link to this Comment: 1892

I definitly believe that addiction is an individual thing. Ultimately, everyone has the last say on what they do to their bodies. Not their friends, their families, or their superiors. Individuals CHOOSE to listen to others or to let them have authority over them. I also believe that everyone has an "addictive personality," people who don't think this just have yet to find what they can get addicted to. For some it's drugs. Others can't stand drugs, but gambling is hard to let go of. The list keeps going. I was almost addicted to snood until my computer got rid of it for some reason (I guess technology is looking out for me in some ways). I also don't think that all addiction is bad. If it's not an obsessive addiction, it can be quite good. Being addicted to a runners high is a great thing, as long as you don't crave it so much that it interferes with your life. Addiction on a lower level can be a breath of fresh air, as long as it IS at that lower level and isn't something that will harm you.


addiction
Name: Ana
Date: //2002-04-20 11:16:36 :
Link to this Comment: 1893

I also believe that addiction is an issue that is unique to each individual, but I think that there are also some absolutes. When the substance starts to control the person using it, and when that person's life is qualified in some way by her use of the substance, there is a definite problem. I think a good way to approach someone dealing with an addiction is to let her know that you will be there for her, and that you will help her help herself.


addiction
Name: Shanti Mik
Date: //2002-04-20 14:28:45 :
Link to this Comment: 1894

How should we begin to talk about addiction in a way that is meaningful and helps women of all ages to better understand the line between being powerless over a behavior that has significant negative consequences and behaviors in moderation, that are a healthy part of our lives. How do we begin to identify when ?the line has been crossed?? All that we do in our lives, eat, sleep, work, study, play, etc. can be taken to extremes and have a negative impact on our health and well-being. How should we begin to think about our lives and our habits to increase our well-being?

Addiction, I think, is in many aspects of our lives. Not all additions are substance addictions and not all addictions are harmful to yourself. To discuss addiction with women, I think the first thing that needs to be said is that it is just as easy to be addiction to a substance as it is to be addicted to a behavior. I'm addicted to organizing and being neat, however, I haven't crossed any lines where it has affected my ability to function. Even this addiction is in moderation. To identify them, we need to first that even routines can be addictions. Some people need a solid routine and some people are addicted to spontaneity. The line has been crossed when your need for the addiction overrides your need for other things. When that addiction becomes the first priority in your life, and it controls how you behave and determines what you do, then it has become out of control. In order to maintain your well being, a person's habits need to be moderated. This does not mean that we have to control every aspect of your life, but by not allowing yourself to overly depend on any one thing will allow a person to not become dependent on soemthing or someone to make them feel good.