BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR INSTITUTE 2002

Forum 9- What particular aspect of our discussions of the motor and sensory sides of the nervous system seem most useful for your classroom, for your teaching in general?


Name:  RaMona Adams
Username:  RWarner@ucwphilly.rr.com
Subject:  Nervous System
Date:  2002-07-16 12:17:01
Message Id:  2228
Comments:
I was surprised to learn that there are many other functioons of the lower nervous system. We do not use the I "Function" as much as I thought. One thing I learned today is that there are more than just five senses. We have many. I was wondering if the glucose sensory does not work in people who are diabetic. Both of my parents are diabetic. They crave sugar more than an average person. Why is this so? Is it because they know that they are not suppose to have it or is it a chemical inbalance in the brain? The things that I learned that would be very useful in the classroom is that the brain plays tricks on us and that a lot of learning takes place without thinking about it. Hence, the saying, sit back, relax, you might learn something by accident.
Name:  Brian & Joan Malin
Username:  malinb1@yahoo.com
Subject:  Input/output
Date:  2002-07-16 13:03:56
Message Id:  2229
Comments:
It is interesting how the brain puts things together for us. You can see why teachers often think they have explained a subject area well to find out later that their students often come up with a different slant on what was taught. In particular, I think that visual information you provided would be of great help to me in my classroom. We often dissect mammalian eyes - and the students come up with insightful, interesting questions - that I often do not have the answers to. Consequently, asking alot of questions is important to find out where students are coming from when we cover specific topics.
Name:  Shellie
Username:  Anonymous
Subject:  motor&sensory nervous system
Date:  2002-07-16 13:14:30
Message Id:  2230
Comments:
I do not have a classroom but I do work with a lot of teachers and a lot of classrooms. I think it is ironic that teachers spend so much energy with students finishing class work, homework ect. when many of the students get the message through the workings of the motor and sensory nervous system without the extra work that the teachers request. I am not sure if this is correct but if it is--teachers could be more relaxed. Maybe they need to be more compulsive with some students who need the extra. I feel if they were less compulsive students would enjoy school more.
Name:  bob/ray
Username:  Anonymous
Subject:  aspects of motor/sensory perception
Date:  2002-07-16 13:23:16
Message Id:  2231
Comments:
"The increasing patterns of unpredictability of mammals was a selective factor for the survival of mammals"
We, as teachers, do our best to minumnize unpredictability of response in our students. WHY do we do this?
Name:  RaMona Adams
Username:  RWarner@ucwphilly.rr.com
Subject:  Nervous System
Date:  2002-07-16 13:29:11
Message Id:  2232
Comments:
I was surprised to learn that there are many other functions of the lower nervous system. We do not use the I "Function" as much as I thought. One thing I learned today is that there are more than just five senses. We have many. I was wondering if the glucose sensory does not work in people who are diabetic. Both of my parents are diabetic. They crave sugar more than an average person. Why is this so? Is it because they know that they are not suppose to have it or is it a chemical inbalance in the brain? The things that I learned that would be very useful in the classroom is that the brain plays tricks on us and that a lot of learning takes place without thinking about it. Hence, the saying, sit back, relax, you might learn something by accident.

Comments from Mike.

I am not surprise to learn that there are more than five primary senses. Such senses as ESP or the body trying to keep homestasis, are evidences that there are other "senses" in the nervous system. Another interesting body of knowledge that was shared is the idea of the the central pattern generator and its behavior when is its operating independently from the "I Function." presently, my little daughter, Michaela, is learning to walk. It is interesting to see her doing it so naturally even though she stumbles and falls. Here she is not using her "I Function," but through central Pattern generator she is moving away step by step.


Name:  Dana, Gerry
Username:  Anonymous
Subject:  unconscious awareness
Date:  2002-07-16 13:30:57
Message Id:  2233
Comments:
Discussion around the "sixth sense" just reinforces a teaching concept which states that to be effective you must meet your students where they are and teach from that point. In other words, you cannot assume that everyone is at the same place and is receiving your input the same way. Everyone's reality is different. Everyone's learning style is different and there are multiple intelligences that affect the sensory side of processing.
Name:  Sharon and Tunde.
Username:  Anonymous
Subject:  Teaching and Learning.
Date:  2002-07-16 13:36:31
Message Id:  2234
Comments:
The main thought that's flashing across my mind now is the need to realize that the fact that I'm teaching doesn't mean that my students are learning. There's a big distinction between the two. A teacer can be up there all school year long, sweating it out in order for the students to learn. But the sad thing is that they are not really learning anything or let me put it better either of the following is taking place;

1. My teaching endeavor (the input) is being processed differently in ther brain or the nervous system thereby making the output or their response to the teaching irrelevant to one another.

2. There are inputs within the nervous system (the box) that are internally generated which are also has a major part to play in the way the kids digest information and show what they have been ableto learn.

We might need to be flexible in our teaching mode from time to time.


Name:  Cynthia A.Brown/Lois Mackey
Username:  cybrown@phila.k12pa.us/loismackey@yahoo.com
Subject:  Classroom Use?
Date:  2002-07-16 13:42:01
Message Id:  2235
Comments:
The section about pheremones would be particularly interesting to children. As well as using the "look a person directly in the eye" experiment to see if the pupil dialates. If the pupil dialates the person is supposedly "interested" in you. This would generate great conversation, as well as laughs, giggles and smiles among the children as they recorded their observations.
Cinny/Lois
Name:  Hope Glover
Username:  hg7151@aol.com
Subject:  I function vs. input with in the box
Date:  2002-07-16 14:56:15
Message Id:  2236
Comments:
I think that today's discussion helped to reinforce my thoughts about teaching science in the classroom. Students not only enjoy learning about science but they remember more when given the opportunity to do hands on activities. When they are writing or listening to a lecture the I function has more control. PG we are your students, please more hands on activities and demonstrations in your laboratory! We want to learn as much as possible about Brain and Behavior.
Name:  Hope Glover
Username:  hg7151@aol.com
Subject:  I function vs. input with in the box
Date:  2002-07-16 14:59:43
Message Id:  2237
Comments:
I think that today's discussion helped to reinforce my thoughts about teaching science in the classroom. Students not only enjoy learning about science but they remember more when given the opportunity to do hands on activities. When they are writing or listening to a lecture the I function has more control. PG we are your students, please more hands on activities and demonstrations in your laboratory! We want to learn as much as possible about Brain and Behavior.

I would like to learn more about how our other senses "complete our reality". The blind spot experiment is intersting. I think the pupil dialation activity is interesting. I wonder what happens when your partner is not fond of you?


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